ASK THE EXPERT // Headaches  

June is National Migraine and Headache Awareness Month

Headaches are common.  It is very likely that each of us has experienced one in the last few weeks.  They can come and go, be minor or major, but what are some of the things that cause our heads to hurt?

Headache is one of the most common types of pain in the world.  Three quarters of the world’s population annually suffers from a headache.  Headaches can cause us to miss out on a family function or miss a day of work or school.  For some continually battling headaches can cause one to feel anxious and depressed.

There are more than 150 types of headaches.  They fall into two main categories:  primary and secondary headaches. 

Primary headaches are headaches that are not due to another medical condition.  Examples include:  Migraine, Cluster headaches, Daily persistent headaches and Tension headaches.

Secondary headaches are related to another medical condition, such as:  Disease of blood vessels in the brain, Head injury, High blood pressure, Infection, Medication misuse, Sinus congestion, Tumor or Trauma. 

A key ingredient to treating headache is figuring out what causes the headache.  Finding out what causes the headache leads to treatment.  There are many components that add up to what type, how often and how severe a headache can be.  Consulting your healthcare provider is the best way to begin to figure out the cause, management and treatment of headaches.  Treatment focuses on relieving symptoms and preventing future headaches.

It is important to consult your medical provider with questions about headaches.  Often times they don’t pose a serious threat, but sometimes can be a symptom of something greater. 

For more information on headaches see:  my.clevelandclinic.org, mayoclinic.org, medlineplus.gov

Posted in General Information /Health Topics /

May is… National Moving Month

May is traditionally the busiest month of the year when it comes to moving.  Right now, home sales continue to be brisk.  The summer months are a popular time to move, especially in Minnesota! 

Moving is always a big task and one which takes some effort and planning.  It is also an adventure with new places, people and possibilities. 

Many of our residents have made the move to Copperfield Hill after downsizing or when they want to have other services available to them.  Transportation, meals, activities, housekeeping and nursing services are just a few things that can be customized for each individual here at Copperfield Hill. 

Many of our residents have moved to Copperfield Hill because a family member or friend lives here.  We also would like to remind you of the “Friends and Family” referral program at Copperfield Hill.  Residents referring new residents will receive a referral gift.

Posted in About Us /Assisted Living /General Information /Independent Living /Memory Care /Senior Living /

What is Podiatry??

April is National Foot Health Awareness Month

Taking care of your feet has an impact on your health.  So when we need care for our feet, why should one seek the help of a Podiatrist?  First of all, feet are a very complex part of the body.  They carry us throughout our day, while acting as shock absorbers and balance for our bodies.  Our feet require good care.  A Doctor of Podiatric Medicine or DPM, is a medical expert that has spent many years and countless hours training in the care of the foot and ankle.  DPM’s are uniquely qualified to take care of this part of the body.  Podiatrists have many fields of specialty, such as sports medicine, wound care, pediatrics and diabetic care. 

At Copperfield Hill there is a monthly podiatry clinic.  Podiatry visits can include: 

~ Comprehensive foot evaluations

~ Nail and callous management

~ Diabetic foot exams

~ Medical equipment evaluations (braces, shoe inserts, diabetic shoes)

These visits are billed to insurance and are routinely covered as office visits by Medicare.

Posted in General Information /Health Topics /Nursing /Senior Living /

Services Offered at Copperfield Hill

When we talk about senior services, the question often arises:  What services do you offer?  Many senior housing communities offer services.  Services can be anything from housekeeping to more complex nursing services like medication management.  However, there are a variety of needs for a variety of people.

At Copperfield Hill, we provide an array of services that help individuals maintain a level of independency and security.  Copperfield Hill offers customized senior living for their residents. 

Our community amenities include: 

  • Transportation
  • Healthy Menu Options
  • Spiritual Enrichment
  • Daily Activities 

Additional services can include: 

  • Housekeeping
  • Meal Plans
  • Oxygen Management
  • Diabetic Management
  • Catheter Care
  • Colostomy Care

There is no “one” blueprint for our residents.  Each individual has a distinct set of wants and needs.  We are here to provide a customized plan and program to meet those wants and needs.  For that reason, we remain a vibrant and active community.  Our residents are proof of that!

Posted in About Us /Assisted Living /Community Amenities /General Information /Independent Living /Memory Care /Nursing /Senior Living /

ASK THE EXPERT // What is Assisted Living?

What exactly does Assisted Living Mean?  Simply put, assisted living provides personalized care in a residential setting.  It is designed for people who require various levels of personal and medical care.  Living spaces are normally an apartment and provide a homelike setting.  Amenities of assisted living are often the same as independent living.  Services are tailored to the needs of each person.  Personal support, medication management, health monitoring, and an active lifestyle are key for any person choosing an assisted living community. 

Memory care support is another facet of assisted living.  Many communities provide a secure area for residents needing memory support.  Again, daily activities, medication and health management are part of the program designed for each individual’s needs. 

The most common reason seniors choose assisted living is needing help with activities of daily living (ADLs).  

Those seeking assistance typically need help with two or more ADLs.  Dressing, bathing, bed transfer, toileting and meal preparation are common.  Many seniors choose a move to assisted living when they reach a point where they want the reassurance of feeling connected to a community instead of living alone and apart.  They often seek to reduce the time and effort spent on cooking, cleaning, laundry and home maintenance.

Assisted living communities typically offer rent, meals, housekeeping and medical programming.  How these services are bundled and priced vary.  Transportation services, activity and spiritual programming and other “extras” can vary from community to community.  Some services are included in the base cost of assisted living and others are an extra charge.

When an individual’s health and well-being requires a higher level of support, assisted living can be a great alternative.  It provides a healthy lifestyle and social engagement, while offering support and security for individuals and their families. 

Keep in mind, assisted living is not skilled nursing or nursing home care.  In skilled nursing, a resident receives full-time medical care by a highly trained medical staff.  There is less choice and more urgency involved when a person needs that level of care.  Assisted living options allow for a personalized level of care and more homelike (and affordable) living situation.

If you have any questions concerning housing options at Copperfield Hill, contact Sherry Price, 763-277-1008.

Posted in About Us /Assisted Living /General Information /Independent Living /Memory Care /Senior Living /

The Great American Smoke Out

Each year, the American Cancer Society hosts the Great American Smoke out on the third Thursday in November.  The Great American Smoke out is an opportunity for people who smoke, to make a plan to quit and commit to a smoke-free and healthier life.  The smoke out starts with one day, but it has the intention of providing individuals with the motivation to quit smoking for good.  Use this date to quit altogether or to make a plan to quit.  The Great American Smoke out event not only is the challenge for individuals to stop smoking but also help people with tools that they can use to help them quit and stay that way.

A deadly and tough to kick addiction, nicotine in cigarettes is one of the strongest additions one can have.  Quitting is not easy for many who smoke.  Like other health improvement plans, one needs the commitment and a plan to make that commitment realized.  There are many quitting methods, such as prescription medications and counseling support.  It is always recommended to consult your health care advisor for information and support.  Having support is a proven way to be successful.

The Great American Smoke out began in the 1970’s when smoking and second hand smoke were very common.  In 1970 at an event in Randolph, MA, people were asked to give up cigarettes for one day and donate the money they saved to a high school scholarship fund.  In 1974 in Monticello, MN another don’t smoke day was spearheaded.  The movement caught on and in 1976 the CA American Cancer Society got nearly 1 million people to quit for the day.  The Smoke out went nation-wide in 1977.  Since then, a lot has changed.  Public view of smoking has changed.  Many public places and work spaces began the move towards a smoke free environment.  Today, very few buildings allow smoking inside. 

Today, less than 16% of Americans smoke.  However over 37 million Americans still smoke.  Each year close to half a million people die from illness caused by smoking.  Smoking is the leading cause of cancer deaths in the US.

Changing attitudes have helped reduce the number of deaths and illness.  Improving your health and quitting smoking go hand in hand. 

Learn more at www.cancer.org.

Posted in General Information /Health Topics /Human Interest /

Denture care:  How do I clean my dentures?*

 

We are focusing on dental health this month, which includes many who use dentures.  Proper care is required for removable partial or full dentures.  It is important to keep them clean and free from stains.

Good denture care includes:

• Remove dentures after eating and run water over them to remove food debris.
• Be careful handling dentures.  When wet they become slippery.  If dropped you can cause damage to dentures.  Also, be sure not to bend or damage the plastic or the denture clasps when cleaning.
• Clean your mouth after removing your dentures.  Use a soft brush or gauze and clean your entire mouth (palate).  Remove any remnant denture adhesive.
• Brush your dentures (at least) daily.  Soak and brush with soft bristled brush and nonabrasive denture cleanser.  Don’t use denture cleaner inside your mouth.
• Soak dentures overnight.  Most types need to stay moist to hold their shape.  Water or mild denture –soaking solution can be used.  Check with your dentist about proper overnight storing of dentures.  Follow manufacturer’s guidelines on cleaning and soaking.
• Rinse well before putting dentures back in your mouth.  Some solutions contain harsh chemicals that can cause burning or pain is swallowed.
• Schedule regular dental exams.  For many reasons, this is important.  Your dentist can help with overall oral hygiene and health as well as proper use of dentures.  Make sure to check with your dentist if the fit of your dentures is not right.  Poor fitting dentures can cause irritation, sores and infection.

Avoid:

• Abrasive cleaning materials.  This can cause damage to dentures.
• Whitening toothpastes.  Often containing peroxide, whitening toothpastes do little to change the color of denture teeth.
• Bleach-containing products.  This can weaken dentures and change their color.  Don’t soak dentures in solutions that contain chlorine bleach.  It can tarnish and corrode the metal in dentures.
• Hot water.  Boiling water can warp your dentures.

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*Mayoclinic.org/denture-care

Posted in General Information /Health Topics /

Reminiscing on Back to School

On August 24th, residents had the opportunity to assist Pastor Jan in filling backpacks for five neighborhood schools within the Robbinsdale School District: Forest Elementary, Lakeview Elementary, Meadow Lake Elementary, Neill Elementary and Northport Elementary.

After packing up the backpacks, a number of residents sat and reminisced about what they remember about the first day of school.  These are sure to be memories many of us share.

“I remember that we always took a picture, every year in the same spot.  So we could have a record of how the children grew!”

“The kids walked to school, they didn’t ride the bus.  They walked home for lunch, too.”  If they didn’t walk home for lunch, we packed a lunch.”

“We did our back to school clothes shopping at Sears, and school supplies we purchased at K-Mart.  Back then, there was no Target.”

“I always sewed the kids clothes.  I made the waistbands with elastic so they would get longer use out of them.  The kids would ask, “when can we have clothes that don’t have an elastic waist?”

“Hair cuts were either at the barber shop or in our kitchen.  We trimmed their bangs, you could tell the ones who trimmed their own bangs!”

Backpack2

Posted in General Information /Spiritual Well Being /Uncategorized /

The Different Types of Grief

August is National Grief Month.  Last week our Pastor, Jan Hartsook talked about grief.  She touched on the different things that can cause us grief and the stages that many go through to work through grief.  Here is a little more information about some types of grief.*

• Normal/Common Grief – Many people cope with grief and carry on a normal daily routine despite their grief.  Under the surface, an individual may be grieving and experiencing intense feelings of grief at different times.  However, on the surface, they seem like they are carrying on as normal.

• Complicated Grief – this is grief such that it actually keeps the individual from carrying on their daily lives.  It can lead to irrational thoughts and avoidance behaviors, like avoiding anything that reminds the griever of their loss.  This can feel like a constant presence making one feel boxed in by the grief.

• Inhibited Grief – To avoid pain, some avoid facing the reality of their loss.  They might throw all their energy into something else; avoiding the grief to avoid the pain.  On occasion, inhibited grief can lead to physical problems like headaches, loss of sleep or digestive issues.

• Disenfranchised Grief – We grieve for many things and this is where disenfranchised grief can appear.  Losing something that does not seem worthy of grief, to others, can put more pressure on the griever to push down or suppress their feelings.  Loss of a pet, a job, someone we don’t actually know, these are all examples.

• Absent Grief – Similar to Inhibited Grief, this happens when feelings are silenced and pushed down.  When people act as if nothing has happened it can lead to denial and avoidance.

• Anticipatory Grief – This is when someone starts to feel grief before loss actually happens.   An example is when you know someone who has a terminal disease, and the emotion of grief begins before they pass away.

• Exaggerated Grief – This type of grief is similar to complicated grief where sorrow and the inability to function don’t improve over time.  Sometimes this happens if someone experiences more than one loss at a time or in a short period of time.  Life feels overwhelming and makes it hard for the griever to cope.

• Cumulative Grief – When there are multiple losses in a short period of time, this can cause cumulative grief.

• Delayed Grief – This is just as described, when feelings of grief don’t appear immediately.  It is possible that pent up feelings of grief can get stronger over time, making it more difficult to cope later than after the initial situation causing the grief.

• Collective Grief – This is a type of grief that is experienced by a group of people.  It might be someone in the public eye, like a political leader or celebrity that people are mourning.  It could also be something that comes as a large event like an earthquake, fire or other natural disaster.

Experiencing grief is a common experience.  We all experience grief, we just don’t all do it in the same way.  There is no one way to experience grief.  Individuals need to be able to recognize and be aware of what is causing them grief and then find the best ways to process it in a healthy and healing way.  Understanding the different types of grief might be of help when we are trying to process grief for ourselves, or when we are helping a loved one with their grief.

 

*Used as resources here, there are many, many resources for information about grief:  happiness.com, knowyourgrief.org, grief.com, mayoclinic.org, psychologytoday.com, health.com

Posted in General Information /Health Topics /Spiritual Well Being /

How We Got Through It

In March of 2020, we could never have imagined what lay ahead for our world and our community. As we look back on the past sixteen months, we can see an evolution. Navigating the uncertain waters of the pandemic will no doubt be remembered as the biggest challenge we know. Our reactions, teamwork, attitudes, sense of humor and determination are all pieces of the puzzle that when put together, pulled us through. We all looked out for our neighbors, co-workers and all the individuals who support Copperfield Hill. We learned a lot and as we creep back to normalcy, when asked what helped us get through, residents and staff gave us their thoughts:

♥ Activities with Beth and Erin

♥ Staying in touch with people through work, seeing family, time with my husband, Zoom/phone calls and prayer time with God

♥ Essential Caregivers, my car, activities

♥ Allowing me to move in to Copperfield Hill during the pandemic

♥ Daily Delights and the activities cart that visited the apartments, weekly COVID updates were informative and encouraging, the staff> Calmness and support from the residents, they endured a lot and it was done with kindness

♥ Faith in God

♥ Family support of my belief to wear a mask and follow mandates

♥ Prayers, thank you notes/emails from residents and families

♥ Painting my house, yard work and watching Netflix with family

♥ Family, friends, my dog and lots of good books

♥ My strong faith in Christ and love for helping people

Our lives were all changed, but the main comment in regards to what got us through, was the presence of human connection. That is something we have and cherish at Copperfield Hill!

Posted in About Us /Activities /General Information /global interest /Health Topics /Spiritual Well Being /