Ask the Expert

October is National Oral Hygiene Month

Dental

We take note of what dental hygienists do and raise awareness of the importance of good oral hygiene and oral health.

It does not matter what age you are, oral hygiene is very important to your overall health. The following are five issues that dental hygienists address: Periodontal Disease, Teeth Whitening, General Oral Care, Cavities and Inflammation

Everyone loves a clean mouth. So, here are the basic steps to keep it clean and healthy!

Floss Daily – There are places a tooth brush just can’t reach.

Brush Twice Daily – Morning and night, brush for two minutes to prevent cavities and gum disease.

Rinse with Mouth Wash – Not only does this keep your mouth clean, it does wonders for your breath.

Question: What is the connection between oral health and overall health?

The mouth is loaded with bacteria. Most of it is harmless, but your mouth is an entry point for your respiratory and digestive systems. Sometimes, harmful bacteria can enter your system and cause disease.

⇒ The body’s natural defense system is strong. Most the time this defense system and good oral hygiene are enough to keep harmful bacteria at bay. But, if you don’t practice good oral hygiene, bacteria can reach high levels causing infections in your mouth that can lead to gum disease and tooth decay.

⇒ Various diseases such as Endocarditis, Cardiovascular Disease and Pneumonia have been linked to poor oral hygiene.

⇒ Conditions that might affect your overall oral health can include: Diabetes, Osteoporosis and Alzheimer’s Disease. Diabetes can put your gums at risk, Osteoporosis can cause weakening of the jaw bone and tooth loss and Alzheimer’s disease can diminish the ability for one to maintain their own oral hygiene.

Eating a healthy diet and limiting added sugar is also helpful. Avoiding tobacco use will also increase the general health of your gums and mouth. Don’t forget to keep a regular schedule of visiting your dentist and oral hygienist. Contacting your oral health professional as soon as you see a problem will help keep a small problem from getting bigger.

 

*Sources: mayoclinic.org, adha.org, nationaltoday.com

 

Posted in General Information /Health Topics /Uncategorized /

The Different Types of Grief

August is National Grief Month.  Last week our Pastor, Jan Hartsook talked about grief.  She touched on the different things that can cause us grief and the stages that many go through to work through grief.  Here is a little more information about some types of grief.*

• Normal/Common Grief – Many people cope with grief and carry on a normal daily routine despite their grief.  Under the surface, an individual may be grieving and experiencing intense feelings of grief at different times.  However, on the surface, they seem like they are carrying on as normal.

• Complicated Grief – this is grief such that it actually keeps the individual from carrying on their daily lives.  It can lead to irrational thoughts and avoidance behaviors, like avoiding anything that reminds the griever of their loss.  This can feel like a constant presence making one feel boxed in by the grief.

• Inhibited Grief – To avoid pain, some avoid facing the reality of their loss.  They might throw all their energy into something else; avoiding the grief to avoid the pain.  On occasion, inhibited grief can lead to physical problems like headaches, loss of sleep or digestive issues.

• Disenfranchised Grief – We grieve for many things and this is where disenfranchised grief can appear.  Losing something that does not seem worthy of grief, to others, can put more pressure on the griever to push down or suppress their feelings.  Loss of a pet, a job, someone we don’t actually know, these are all examples.

• Absent Grief – Similar to Inhibited Grief, this happens when feelings are silenced and pushed down.  When people act as if nothing has happened it can lead to denial and avoidance.

• Anticipatory Grief – This is when someone starts to feel grief before loss actually happens.   An example is when you know someone who has a terminal disease, and the emotion of grief begins before they pass away.

• Exaggerated Grief – This type of grief is similar to complicated grief where sorrow and the inability to function don’t improve over time.  Sometimes this happens if someone experiences more than one loss at a time or in a short period of time.  Life feels overwhelming and makes it hard for the griever to cope.

• Cumulative Grief – When there are multiple losses in a short period of time, this can cause cumulative grief.

• Delayed Grief – This is just as described, when feelings of grief don’t appear immediately.  It is possible that pent up feelings of grief can get stronger over time, making it more difficult to cope later than after the initial situation causing the grief.

• Collective Grief – This is a type of grief that is experienced by a group of people.  It might be someone in the public eye, like a political leader or celebrity that people are mourning.  It could also be something that comes as a large event like an earthquake, fire or other natural disaster.

Experiencing grief is a common experience.  We all experience grief, we just don’t all do it in the same way.  There is no one way to experience grief.  Individuals need to be able to recognize and be aware of what is causing them grief and then find the best ways to process it in a healthy and healing way.  Understanding the different types of grief might be of help when we are trying to process grief for ourselves, or when we are helping a loved one with their grief.

 

*Used as resources here, there are many, many resources for information about grief:  happiness.com, knowyourgrief.org, grief.com, mayoclinic.org, psychologytoday.com, health.com

Posted in General Information /Health Topics /Spiritual Well Being /

Dementia and Delirium; Know the Difference

The Difference Between Dementia and Delirium

Cognitive impairment is more common as we age. Dementia and delirium are two common causes. Delirium and dementia have similarities and can be confusing to experience and to distinguish. Both can cause memory loss, poor judgment, a decreased ability to communicate and impaired functioning. However, there are many differences between the two.

60060bec029dc.image

“Dementia resembles delirium in the same way an ultramarathon resembles a dash across the street. Same basic components, vastly different scale.” ~Floyd Skloot

Onset: Dementia typically begins slowly and is gradually noticed over time. If the person who’s being evaluated is unknown to you, having a report of his usual functioning is key. Delirium is usually a sudden or acute change in condition. One day, someone is doing fine, the next, they may be very confused and unable to perform tasks, like dressing.

Cause: Dementia is typically a disease such as Alzheimer’s, vascular dementia, Lewy Body dementia, frontotemporal dementia or a related disorder. Delirium is usually triggered by a specific illness, including: urinary tract infection, pneumonia, dehydration, illicit drug use, or withdrawal from drugs or alcohol. Medication interactions can also cause delirium.

Duration:   Dementia is a progressive, chronic disease that is incurable. Delirium is normally short term and can last for a couple of days to a couple of months. Delirium is almost always temporary if the cause is identified and treated.

Communication Abilities: People with dementia often experience difficulty remembering and finding the right words. Their ability to express themselves erodes over time as the disease progresses. Delirium may cause inappropriate and/or incoherent communication that is uncharacteristic for the individual.

Attention Span and Memory: With dementia a person’s memory is significantly affected throughout the disease. The level of alertness is typically not affected until the late stages of the disease. With delirium, memory functioning is usually less affected, but the general ability to focus and maintain attention is very poor.

Activity Level: Dementia tends to not affect a person’s activity level until the later stages. People with delirium are often overly active (hyper and restless) or under-active (lethargic and less responsive) compared to usual activity.

Treatment: There are a few medications approved by the FDA to treat Alzheimer’s disease, the most common type of dementia. They don’t cure dementia but sometimes can slow the progression of the symptoms, including: memory loss, poor judgment and behavioral changes. Delirium requires immediate treatment by a physician. Because delirium is usually caused by a physical illness or infection, medications are often effective.

 

Sources: mayoclinic.org, merckmanuals.com, verywellhealth.com, alz.org

 

Posted in Alzheimer's Disease /Health Topics /Memory Care /Nursing /Senior Living /

Diet Choices That Can Boost Sleep Quality

Diet-and-Exercise-and-Sleep

In March we welcome the change of seasons. We are excited to say goodbye to winter and the cold weather. With the promise of Summer on the horizon, many people are refocusing their attention on their health and wellness journey.  This often includes attention to your diet, which can help with better weight management.

If you are seeking to make changes to your nutrition and diet, sleep plays an important factor in being successful.  Many of us feel especially sluggish after the winter hibernation. In addition, we experienced the change of our clocks. We jumped ahead one hour due to Daylight Savings. The National Sleep Foundation has claimed the week after Daylight Savings to be Sleep Awareness Week. In 2021, Sleep Awareness Week is dated March 14th through March 20th.

We have compiled a few options on how to achieve a better night’s sleep through our nutrition choices during the day.

Fruits – An important piece for any diet, but when we are speaking about sleep specifically, look at eating more cherries or kiwis. Cherries have been found to help decrease the effects of insomnia. Cherries contain a high amount of the sleep-promoting hormone, melatonin. Eating kiwis two hours before bed has been found to help with falling asleep faster, staying asleep longer and waking up less frequently.

Caffeine – Most of us know to avoid caffeine before bed. The rule is to avoid caffeine 5 to 6 hours before bed. Caffeine can be tricky because it can also be found in the foods we consume, it’s not limited to beverages like coffee or soda.

Snacking – Avoid late night snacking. Try to stop eating 2 to 3 hours before you go to bed. Snacking can lead to broken sleep, individuals find themselves waking up more frequently during the night.

Spicy food – Eating spicy food can cause heartburn which can impact your sleep. Acid reflux can worsen and irritate an individual’s airways. Avoid consuming spicy foods within 3 hours of going to bed.

Alcohol – Drinking alcohol before bed is typically not the best choice. Alcohol is a sedative and it may help you fall asleep, but it reduces the overall quality of sleep you receive. Most people find themselves waking up more frequently during the night.

Sources: Sleep.org and Hopkinsmedicine.org

Posted in Fun Facts /General Information /Health Topics /Uncategorized /

Let’s March into Spring HEALTHIER

March is

screen_shot_2019-03-21_at_11.35.17_am

National Nutrition Month was created by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. The month focuses on helping people make informed and healthy food choices. They focus on developing better eating habits and healthy physical activities. Many common health problems can be prevented by taking charge of your diet and exercise. Paying attention to what you eat and drink and physical movement are two of the biggest ways you can take control of your health.

Common health problems that can positively benefit from a good eating regime are many. At any age it is important to pay attention to what you eat and the quantity. Our diet contributes to our overall well being.

Diabetes is a long lasting disease that affects how your body turns food into energy. There are different types of Diabetes. Over 34 million people live with diabetes and over 85 million live with prediabetes. Most of the food we eat is broken down into sugar (glucose) and released into our bloodstream. When your blood sugar goes up, your pancreas is signaled to release insulin. Insulin acts like a key to let the blood sugar into your body’s cells for use as energy. With diabetes, your body doesn’t make insulin or can’t use it properly. Over time, serious health problems can develop, such as heart disease, kidney disease and vision loss.

Living with diabetes can be a challenge. But one can do a lot of good by eating well and staying active. A healthy diet that includes a balance of nutrient rich foods is extremely important. Balancing your blood sugar is the key to staying well. Knowledge is power, so here’s a list of things to help create a healthy eating plan.

Meal Planning - Make a plan so you are not caught without the proper foods to sustain your health

Grocery Shopping - Helps keep you on track with your meal plans

Read Food Labels - Know the nutritional value of the food you purchase

Eating Out - Have a plan before you go to a restaurant, choose wisely

M0ENFXBK

 

Learn much, much more at: mayoclinic.org, cdc.org, diabetes.org, eatingwell.org

 

Posted in Fun Facts /General Information /Health Topics /

February is…

NATIONAL HEART HEALTH MONTH

heart

In 2010, the American Heart Association presented a strategic plan to reduce cardiovascular disease in the United States. It identified seven of the most important behaviors people can follow to protect their cardiovascular health.

Exercise: Regular exercise improves nearly every aspect of your health.

Eat right: Seek out foods such as nuts, whole grains, beans, fruits, vegetables, seafood, yogurt, and healthy fats.

Blood Pressure: Get your blood pressure checked, make sure your heart isn’t working harder than it should be.

Cholesterol: Know your cholesterol level and keep it low.

Keep blood sugar levels down: Exercise and diet help keep blood sugar levels in check.

Maintain a healthy weight: Fat cells release many substances that increase inflammation, promote insulin resistance, and contribute to atherosclerosis.

Don’t smoke: Smoking and the use of tobacco products isn’t just bad for your lungs, it is bad for your heart too.

Posted in General Information /global interest /Health Topics /Heart Health /History /Human Interest /Independent Living /Nursing /Safety /Senior Living /

Life is a Series of Experiences…

A Timely Message – January 22, 2021

This vaccine will change the world and because of residency in a high priority community, we will be fortunate enough to receive the vaccine sooner than most. I expect that this will bring back normalcy to our lives.

As the founder of Copperfield Hill, and a proud member of our generation, I will be on hand when the providers come to administer the vaccine at Copperfield Hill and be the first to be vaccinated. I have full faith and confidence in the sciences and doctors who have developed this life saving vaccine and want to demonstrate my commitment to you that it is safe and life giving for all the residents of Copperfield Hill. You have shown your faith in our staff and our community by choosing to let us provide for your safety, comfort, wellness and well-being. Thank you, from the bottom of my heart.

~ Darrel Farr

20201216_160620 IMG_60661 IMG_18791 IMG_61431

 

Life is a series of experiences and at Copperfield Hill we want you to enjoy them.

It is a great feeling to be able to continue to be the warmth, joy and hope for our residents.  Human connection is one of our most valuable resources.  Each day our residents share connections with friends, family and our staff.  Right now, we know the care, comfort and connection we share is more important than ever.  Each day our Copperfield Hill Family makes sure the needs of all are being met.  Whether it be personal care, meal preparation, pastoral care or medication management, we are here to make sure you and your loved ones are provided with the attention and care that will provide a warm and thriving environment to call home.  Because each person has different needs, our services and programs are tailored for each individual.

Led by the family that founded Copperfield Hill, each member of our staff is dedicated to the health and wellbeing of our residents.  Our promise is to provide the services that make Copperfield Hill a tremendous place to call home.

 

Each day we provide:

Independent Living, Assisted Living and Memory Care

Our Recreation Wellness Director plans an array of socialization opportunities (small groups at this time)

Certified Nursing Assistants on-site 24 hours a day

RN and LPN team on-site to coordinate care

PT/OT works with clients in their homes

Three meals a day served in our dining rooms or delivered

Transportation for medical appointments

Salon on-site, open Mondays and Thursdays

 

Posted in About Us /Activities /Assisted Living /Community Living /General Information /Health Topics /Independent Living /Safety /Senior Living /

A Timely Message

The Vaccine is Arriving

The release of the Coronavirus vaccine has been greeted with mixed  emotions by the public. At Copperfield Hill, we welcome this event with joy. The people we serve can remember the events of the Polio epidemic in the 40’s and 50’s. People were “scared to death”. Then came the vaccine, the public was vaccinated and polio disappeared.

However, one difference for the Coronavirus vaccine will be the elimination of long lines. Copperfield Hill and other senior housing communities will have high priority and receive the vaccine ahead of the general public. Our residents will be able to receive the vaccine from the comforts of their homes.

 

First Round of Vaccination is January 13, 2021

20201001_134412Polio

Posted in About Us /global interest /Health Topics /Nursing /Senior Living /

How to survive Thanksgiving with Diabetes?

November is American Diabetes Month

How to survive Thanksgiving with Diabetes?

Thanksgiving is a day to reflect upon what we are thankful for. Most people say goodbye to their diets on this day, but people with diabetes cannot afford to do that.

However, Diabetics can still enjoy Thanksgiving in full if they follow some easy tips:

Plan Ahead – Get to know the menu beforehand and plan what you are going to eat.

Eat in Moderation – It is okay to indulge in potatoes, just remember to not pile them on your plate. One-quarter of your plate can be dedicated to carbohydrates.

Fill up on vegetables – Vegetables such as green beans, carrots, broccoli or brussel sprouts are free game.

Check your blood sugar often – Start by knowing how foods affect your levels… Then, start checking your blood sugar two hours after you finish eating, and every two hours or so after that.

5836207611121.image

 

Photo Source: wtxl.com

Learn how to plan your Thanksgiving meal here.

Posted in General Information /Health Topics /