Celebrating Veterans Day

Veterans Day gives Americans the opportunity to celebrate the bravery and sacrifice of all U.S. veterans. However, many Americans confuse this holiday with Memorial Day.

Veterans Day was first known as Armistice Day. The holiday was established as a legal U.S. holiday to honor the end of World War I.  November 11, 1918 marked the end of WWI, but it was not until 1938 for legislation to be passed in recognition of the holiday.   Veterans Day was established as a U.S. Holiday on November 11th.

In 1954, the United States had been through two World Wars and the Korean War. At that time, Congress strongly recommended the veterans service organizations to amend the word “Armistice” to the word “Veterans”. Thus the holiday was known as Veterans Day. In the late 60’s the November 11th date was changed to ensure federal employees a three day weekend holiday. Thus, Veterans Day was moved to the fourth Monday of October. This caused confusion and disagreement among those who believed the original November 11th date should be honored. So, in 1975, President Gerald Ford signed a law to return Veterans Day to the original date of November 11. Since then, it has been celebrated on November 11.

While Memorial Day honors service members who died in service to their country, deceased veterans are honored on Veterans Day. Veterans Day is set aside to thank and honor the living veterans who served honorably in the military, in both wartime and peacetime. This history is important so that we can honor our current and former service members appropriately.

Veterans Day is observed across the country with many different events. Special programs and honor ceremonies, parades, wreath laying ceremonies along with many private businesses offering special value promotions for veterans and their families.

 

Learn more are at: military.com, va.gov, defense.gov

Posted in veterans /Veterans Day /

November is National Alzheimer’s Disease Awareness Month

President Ronald Reagan designated the month of November as Alzheimer’s Awareness Month in 1983. At that time, less than two million people suffered with the disease. Today, that number is now closer to five million.

Alzheimer’s disease is one type of dementia, which is characterized by a decline in memory, language, problem solving and other thinking skills that affect a person’s ability to perform everyday tasks and activities. It is the most common type of dementia.

Is there a cure? Currently there are no drugs or treatments to cure Alzheimer’s disease.

 

However, there are some treatments that can slow down the progression.   Research is constantly being done for new options with the goal of a cure.

Alzheimer’s disease symptoms can vary, but often include: memory loss, trouble solving problems, confusion about space and time, misplacing things, inability to retrace one’s movements and mood/personality changes.

There are ways to help people coping with the early stages of the disease. Help them keep a common daily routine, keep things simple and don’t have too many activities going on at once. Overstimulation can cause confusion and anxiety. Be reassuring and don’t try to change behaviors by reasoning.

*For more information visit: alz.org, mayoclinic.org and alzinfo.org.

Posted in Alzheimer's Disease /Health Topics /Senior Living /