Category Archives: Health Topics

A Timely Message

The Vaccine is Arriving

The release of the Coronavirus vaccine has been greeted with mixed  emotions by the public. At Copperfield Hill, we welcome this event with joy. The people we serve can remember the events of the Polio epidemic in the 40’s and 50’s. People were “scared to death”. Then came the vaccine, the public was vaccinated and polio disappeared.

However, one difference for the Coronavirus vaccine will be the elimination of long lines. Copperfield Hill and other senior housing communities will have high priority and receive the vaccine ahead of the general public. Our residents will be able to receive the vaccine from the comforts of their homes.

 

First Round of Vaccination is January 13, 2021

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Posted in About Us /global interest /Health Topics /Nursing /Senior Living /

How to survive Thanksgiving with Diabetes?

November is American Diabetes Month

How to survive Thanksgiving with Diabetes?

Thanksgiving is a day to reflect upon what we are thankful for. Most people say goodbye to their diets on this day, but people with diabetes cannot afford to do that.

However, Diabetics can still enjoy Thanksgiving in full if they follow some easy tips:

Plan Ahead – Get to know the menu beforehand and plan what you are going to eat.

Eat in Moderation – It is okay to indulge in potatoes, just remember to not pile them on your plate. One-quarter of your plate can be dedicated to carbohydrates.

Fill up on vegetables – Vegetables such as green beans, carrots, broccoli or brussel sprouts are free game.

Check your blood sugar often – Start by knowing how foods affect your levels… Then, start checking your blood sugar two hours after you finish eating, and every two hours or so after that.

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Photo Source: wtxl.com

Learn how to plan your Thanksgiving meal here.

Posted in General Information /Health Topics /

November is National Diabetes Month

November is National Diabetes Month

Diabetes is a chronic disease that affects over 34 million Americans, 12 million of which are citizen 65 and older. As a prevalent and chronic disease, it is important to shed some light on some misconceptions.

It is a myth that only people who are overweight develop diabetes. Weight and obesity are risk factors but they are not the only ones to be considered. Age, family history, and ethnicity are also important risk factors. Many people diagnosed with diabetes are normal weight. Another myth, has to do with what type diet a person with diabetes should eat. A healthy eating plan for people with diabetes is generally the same as a healthy eating plan for anyone.  In addition, diabetics can eat sweets. The key is small portions and limited frequency.

People are able to live normal lives while managing diabetes. Sticking to a healthy lifestyle can control the symptoms and complications associated with the disease. There is no cure for diabetes. The best way to combat the disease is to: a healthy diet, exercise and if needed, medication prescribed by a physician.

Some patients require blood sugar testing. Some, may benefit from the uses of insulin or oral medications. Managing diabetes is often about finding the right combination of healthy living options and medication management to help maintain blood glucose levels. Each person with diabetes is different, so an individualized plan of action is required. For more information one should contact a medical professional. Additional information is available from the American Diabetes Association.

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Photo Source: https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/

 

To find this and to learn more about Diabetes click here

Posted in General Information /Health Topics /Nursing /Senior Living /

ASK THE EXPERT

Laughter is the best medicine… 

Staying healthy sometimes seems like a lot of work.  One way to increase our wellness is to simply laugh.  Life isn’t always funny, but there are good reasons, both physically and emotionally, to laugh!

 

  • Laughter makes us healthier.  It lowers our blood pressure, reduces stress hormones and increases muscle flexion.  It increases the circulation of antibodies in the blood stream and makes us more resistant to infection.

 

  • Laughter touches our soul. Laughter is good for us physically – it’s good for the soul.  It brings us closer to one another and there is something that is wonderful about that.  Sometimes laughter catches us by surprise and that can make us feel great.

 

  • Laughter keeps things in perspective.  Laughter helps us lighten up and take ourselves less seriously.

 

  • Laughter helps us stay positive.  Laughter helps us keep our troubles in perspective and that can help us stay positive.  It creates positive emotions and thus a positive frame of mind.  Laughter is much like changing a babies diaper.  It doesn’t last long but it sure helps in the short term.

 

  • Laughter is loving.  We laugh at our mistakes and foibles.  We find humor with our friends and family.  We laugh together.  These positive experiences give us the gifts of joy and love.

 

~stopdoingnothing.com

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Posted in Activities /Fun Facts /General Information /Health Topics /Human Interest /Spiritual Well Being /Uncategorized /

September 2020: Notes from Nursing

During these uncertain times, daily routines have been drastically changed.  However, one thing that has not changed, is our commitment and service for our residents here at Copperfield Hill.   We are happy to report that some things are back on schedule.  Here are a few things to note:

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Podiatry appointments have resumed for residents in both The Manor and The Lodge.  Residents in The Lodge must sign up with the nursing department.  Residents in The Manor may sign up in the front office with the Concierge.  Please contact our nursing staff if you have questions.

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Flu shots will be offered to residents in both The Manor and The Lodge. Sign up will be available with the Concierge.  We are encouraging all residents and staff to get a flu shot this fall.  Please have your insurance information available.

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Based on the guidance of the MN Department of Health, Copperfield Hill is welcoming “Essential Caregivers” on campus.  An Essential Caregiver is a third party caregiver that at this time during the pandemic, will provide in-person care and assistance to a resident of Copperfield Hill.  All determinations are made on a case by case basis.  Determinations are based on an assessment by the RN and a consultation with the Executive Director.

Beginning at the end of July, Copperfield Hill has welcomed a number of Essential Caregivers.  There are very strict guidelines and policies in place for this program.  Please consult your building manager if you have questions.

 

Posted in Activities /Health Topics /Nursing /

Staying active in Memory Care

There are many ways that Copperfield Hill residents are staying busy during the Quarantine. No doubt, it has been a very challenging time. However, it is essential to keep busy and occupied with stimulating and safe activities that keep us all connected.*

*All activities follow social distancing guidelines.

Here are a few examples:

Manicures and Pedicures. Any day is a good day to relax and get pampered.

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Arts and Crafts. Nothing passes the time like a good craft!

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Enjoying the Secure Outdoor Patio. At Copperfield Hill we have a secure patio space for residents to get outside safely. Many like to sit outside and get fresh air, but this space also allows us to GARDEN.

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Celebrating Birthdays. You can never skip someone’s birthday. No matter what is happening in the world. We should always stop and celebrate the special people in our lives.

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Sing-A-longs.  We are very lucky to have musically talented residents. Music is a powerful tool with memory care residents.

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Coffee Hours. Even though we keep our residents busy during the day, it is important to take a seat and indulge in a cup of Joe.

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BINGO. We are consistently thinking of ways to reinvent the game. Our residents have enjoyed variations including: Traditional BINGO, Music BINGO and Candy Bar BINGO.

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Celebrating Holidays. We haven’t skipped any opportunity to CELEBRATE. Pictured below are moments from Earth Day, Memorial Day and Mother’s Day observations.

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Posted in Activities /Alzheimer's Disease /Memory Care /Senior Living /Uncategorized /

How to Wear a Face Mask

It’s a new habit that most of us are taking on for the first time – wearing a face mask.  Below is a graphic from WebMD on the do’s and don’t of wearing a face mask properly.

 

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Posted in Health Topics /Safety /

Beating The Winter Blues

It’s that time of year again. Much shorter days, less natural sunlight and our coldest months (January and February) ahead of us. With this in mind, many people may be finding themselves feeling more isolated and even a bit blue. It’s not just the length of day, there is a direct relationship to the holidays and the amount of activity that tends to fall off after the festivities are over. What is it about this time of year that can have us feeling a bit off our game? What can we do about it?

Seasonal Affective Disorder or SAD is commonly referred to as the winter blues. It is a clinical diagnosis according to the National Institute of Health*. It occurs more commonly in the northern part of the country where it is colder.  Shorter days and less sunlight can cause the internal clock, or circadian rhythm, for someone to change. For many, the change can cause shifts in their melatonin levels, causing mood disruption.

To offset the lack of natural light, light therapy can help. The use of light therapy lamps is common to replace missing daylight hours.

Also, talking about how you feel with family, friends and health professionals can help offset the winter blues. Feeling “down” is not uncommon and talking about those feelings can help. Many times, just talking can help you recognize what might be bothering you and also help identify activities and behaviors that can help turn to a more positive outlook. Finding things that fill you with joy and a feeling of accomplishment can help tremendously.

Below are a few ideas to help with SAD:

  • Do something you enjoy.
  • Weather permitting, make sure when the sun is out, get out in it!
  • Spend time with people you enjoy. Family and friends help support one another.
  • Eat a balanced and nutritious diet.
  • Don’t expect change overnight. Your mood will change gradually with self-care and attention to what makes you feel better.

*Learn more at: NIH.gov, clevelandclinic.org and mayoclinic.org

Posted in Health Topics /

December is Flu Fighting Month

December is all about staying healthy and fighting the flu. December 1-7, is National Hand Washing Awareness Week and Influenza Vaccination Week.

According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), the best way to prevent seasonal flu is to get vaccinated each year. This can be achieved by a visit to a variety of health providers. Your physician can normally provide a flu shot, but so can local pharmacies and clinics. Also, take actions daily, to stop the spread of harmful germs and thus the flu virus. Covering your nose and mouth when sneezing and coughing and washing your hands often are ways to prevent germs from spreading. If you do get sick, there are prescription medications called “antiviral drugs” that can be used to treat flu symptoms.

You can also avoid getting the flu by just taking good care of yourself. Eat a healthy diet and drink plenty of fluids. Consider cutting back on caffeine and alcohol which can cause dehydration.  Keep up your exercise routine. Just because it is cold outside does not mean quit moving.

Daily preventative actions can help fight illness. Keeping surfaces clean and disinfected is a sure way to kill household germs. Wipe down handles, faucets, phones, work surfaces that you touch often. Don’t forget your work environment and the car.

You can learn more at cdc.gov, mayoclinic.org and nih.gov

Posted in Health Topics /