Category Archives: History

February is…

NATIONAL HEART HEALTH MONTH

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In 2010, the American Heart Association presented a strategic plan to reduce cardiovascular disease in the United States. It identified seven of the most important behaviors people can follow to protect their cardiovascular health.

Exercise: Regular exercise improves nearly every aspect of your health.

Eat right: Seek out foods such as nuts, whole grains, beans, fruits, vegetables, seafood, yogurt, and healthy fats.

Blood Pressure: Get your blood pressure checked, make sure your heart isn’t working harder than it should be.

Cholesterol: Know your cholesterol level and keep it low.

Keep blood sugar levels down: Exercise and diet help keep blood sugar levels in check.

Maintain a healthy weight: Fat cells release many substances that increase inflammation, promote insulin resistance, and contribute to atherosclerosis.

Don’t smoke: Smoking and the use of tobacco products isn’t just bad for your lungs, it is bad for your heart too.

Posted in General Information /global interest /Health Topics /Heart Health /History /Human Interest /Independent Living /Nursing /Safety /Senior Living /

The History of Friday the 13th

Friday, November 13, 2020

In a good year, Friday the 13th carries its reputation of bad luck. In a pandemic year, who knows what it will bring.

The origins of the Western fear of the number 13 is unclear. Some date it back to a Norse myth about 12 gods having a dinner party and a 13th uninvited guest arrives.  Others relate the fear of the number 13 to the Code of Hammurabi. The Code allegedly missed a 13th law from its list of legal rules. This event is commonly viewed as simply, a clerical error. However, superstitious people will point to this as proof of 13’s longstanding negative associations. There is a biblical theory as well.  The Last Supper was attended by 13 guests.  Jesus and his 12 apostles attended and one of those apostles went on to betray Jesus.

Why Friday though? Most people look forward to Friday every week. It is the sign of another work week done and ushers in the happiness of the weekend. The negative association with Friday is linked to religious and cultural origins. Biblically, Friday is seen to be more ominous because it is the day Jesus was crucified.

Friday and the number 13, how did these two “unlucky” things get paired together? There are infinite theories and most have been dismissed. Friday the 13th really gained attention and hysteria in the 20th century.  An author by the name of Thomas Lawson published a book titled, Friday, the Thirteenth, which is about a stockbroker who deliberately chooses to crash the stock market on this given date. The following year, the New York Times became one of the first channels to recognize the superstition. Fast forward to the 1980’s when a new movie franchise was born. It featured the anti-hero, Jason Voorhees terrorizing infamous Camp Crystal Lake. “Friday the 13th” became a popular culture phenomenon and added to the superstitions attached to the date.

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Sources: wikipedia.com, History.com and CNN.com

 

Posted in Fun Facts /General Information /global interest /History /

Who was Leif Erikson?

October 9th marks Leif Erikson Day

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Leif Erikson  is generally believed to be the first European to reach the North American continent.  He was son of Erik the Red, founder of the first European settlement on what is now called Greenland.  Around 1000 A.D., Erikson sailed to Norway where he was converted to Christianity by King Olaf I.  Losing his course returning to Greenland, Erikson landed on the North American Continent.  Due to the abundance of wild grapes that were growing there, he called it Vinland.  He spent time on Vinland and returned to Greenland.  He never made a return trip to North America.

The location of Vinland in North America has been debated over the centuries.  In the early 1960’s excavations at L’Anse aux Meadows, on the northernmost tip of Newfoundland, uncovered evidence of what is believed to be the base camp of the 11th century Viking exploration.

Upon Erik the Red’s death,  Leif took over the Greenland settlement.  He had two sons, Thorgils and Thorkel.  Thorkel became chief after his father’s death in 1025.

In the late 19th century many Nordic Americans celebrated Leif Erikson as the first European explorer of the New world.  In 1964, President Johnson declared October 9th as “Leif Erikson Day”.

DID YOU KNOW?

Down at the Minnesota State Capitol building in St. Paul, there is a statue of Leif Erikson.

MN LEif Erikson

Source: History.com

 

Posted in global interest /History /

Happy Fourth of July!!

To our Friends and Family -

We wish each of you a very Happy Fourth of July! Since 1776 America has celebrated Independence Day.  We celebrate and commemorate the adoption the the Declaration of Independence.

At Copperfield Hill, one way we show our spirit is by lining our property with American Flags.  We hope you enjoy the weekend celebration of the 4th with  friends and family.  Social Distancing of course!

 

You can learn more about the Fourth of July by visiting the Library of Congress website: www.loc.gov

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Posted in Fourth of July /global interest /History /Human Interest /Uncategorized /