Category Archives: Uncategorized

BETTER BREAKFAST MONTH: Diabetes – Friendly Options

Creating a healthy breakfast each morning is an important way to start your day. This can improve your energy levels and cognition.

Patients with diabetes find it imperative to start their day with a healthy breakfast. Glucose levels will regulate with breakfast, following a fast through the overnight hours.

Not all breakfast food are great options to consume. Diabetics should focus on meals with fiber, healthy fats and lean protein.

DIABETES – FRIENDLY BREAKFAST OPTIONS

Eggs: Eggs are high in protein but low in carbs and calories, making them a perfect choice for people with diabetes.

Greek Yogurt: Contains less sugar and more protein than the regular kind.

Oatmeal: Oatmeal is full of fiber that helps you feel full and stabilizes your blood sugar.

Whole Grains: Whole-grain breads and cereals are also great sources of fiber.

Source: September is Better Breakfast Month: Diabetes-Friendly Options – America’s Best Care Plus (americasbestcareplus.com)

Posted in Health Topics /Uncategorized /

September Is Better Breakfast Month

Rise and Shine! Many Americans are in a time crunch in the morning or we have developed poor eating habits with our morning routine. With the change of season, September is a great month to spend time learning the importance of starting our day with breakfast.

Research has been conducted to show a substantial difference in the overall health and well-being of an individual who eats a balanced breakfast.

WHY BETTER BREAKFAST MONTH IS IMPORTANT

· Eating a healthy breakfast helps control your weight

· It helps you fit in all of your daily nutrients

· Breakfast is delicious

IDEAS OF HEALTHY BREAKFAST FOODS

· Scrambled Eggs: Include turkey bacon, fruit and whole grain toast to round out the meal.

· Whole-Grain Waffles: serve with fresh fruit.

· English Muffin Sandwich: Toast a whole-grain muffin. Add low-fat cheese and sliced deli ham.

· Breakfast Tacos: Scramble eggs with beans in tortilla. Add salsa and low fat cheese.

· Whole-Grain Cereal: Add fresh fruit to your unsweetened cereal.

· Yogurt Parfait: Layer yogurt with fresh or frozen fruit and granola.

· Smoothie: Blend low-fat milk, frozen strawberries and a banana. Enjoy with a bran muffin.

· Oatmeal: Eliminate the added sugar and add fresh fruit, dried cranberries and almonds.

Source: https://www.eatright.org/food/planning-and-prep/snack-and-meal-ideas/6-tips-for-better-breakfasts

Posted in Fun Facts /General Information /Health Topics /Uncategorized /

National Simplify Your Life Week

August 1-7, 2022

National Simplify Your Life Week is an opportunity to examine one’s life through physical and psychological clutter. Clutter through our home and personal commitments can bring stress and anxiety.

The history of National Simplify Your Life Week is unknown. However the purpose to promote a stress-free life is thought by many to be a beneficial observation.

Decreasing items from your home, calendar and energy will allow you space to breathe and focus on the areas that bring you joy. Below are four ways to simplify your life.

DECLUTTER YOUR HOUSE

Living in a home with stacks of papers, disorganized closets and heaps of clothes can provide a psychological feeling of being overwhelmed. Decluttering one room at a time is a suggested starting point. You will feel at peace once you have fewer items to worry about.

GET RID OF BAD MENTAL HABITS

Focusing on your past choices and self-pity are examples of unhealthy habits. Create an opportunity to increase your thoughts on gratitude and self-compassion. Arise each day by stating one item you are thankful for.

CUT OUT TOXIC PEOPLE

Negative people can take up extra space in your life by bringing your mental health down rather than being a positive influencer. This does not mean we eliminate people from our lives who are going through hard circumstances. Creating healthy boundaries is vital to an overall stable mental health.GAIN CONTROL OF YOUR TIME

Stop overcommitting your schedule. Allow space in your calendar to focus on the things that matter most to you. Your days and time are precious. Don’t focus on all your tasks and being busy. Allow space in your schedule to just “be”. Be in the moment. Read a book. Take a walk and have a conversation with those you love.

Sources: 

https://nationaltoday.com/national-simplify-your-life-week/

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/what-mentally-strong-people-dont-do/201807/5-ways-simplify-your-life

Posted in Fun Facts /General Information /Health Topics /Safety /Uncategorized /

ASK THE EXPERT // High Blood Pressure  

May is National Blood Pressure Education Month

High blood pressure is a condition in which the force of the blood against the artery walls is too high.  Uncontrolled high blood pressure raises the risk for heart disease and stroke, which are leading causes of death in the United States. Fortunately, high blood pressure is treatable and preventable. To lower your risk, get your blood pressure checked regularly and take action to control your blood pressure if it is too high. 

5 Surprising Facts About High Blood Pressure:

1.  High blood pressure is common, with more than 3 millions US cases per year.

2.  High blood pressure is linked to a higher risk for dementia, a loss of cognitive function. 

3.  Young people can have high blood pressure.  It isn’t just older adults who have high blood pressure.  Between

20 and 25 percent of men and women ages 33-44 have high blood pressure. This is linked to the rise in obesity rates.

4.  High blood pressure usually doesn’t have any symptoms.  Some call it the “silent killer”.  Even if you feel fine, have your blood pressure checked and talk to a doctor about your risk for high blood pressure.  Lack of symptoms and inconsistent checkups and health care monitoring, causes those who suffer to be undetected.

5.  Women and minorities face unique risks when it comes to high blood pressure.  Women can run into problems during pregnancy.  Some minority groups also have higher rates of high blood pressure. 

The best way to keep high blood pressure under control is to have regular health care visits and to follow instructions from your health provider. 

More information can be found at:  heart.org, cdc.gov, clevelandclinic.org and nia.nih.gov.

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ASK THE EXPERT // Keeping Your Feet Healthy

We use our feet a lot.  Most days, we don’t even realize how much.  When we start our day we plant them on the floor and set in motion our daily activities that begin with a step!  Even a moderate walker, will circle the Earth at the equator about 4 1/2 times in a lifetime.  We need our feet to be healthy and feel good.  Below are some general foot care tips for healthy feet:

· Check your feet daily to make sure you don’t have a surprise cut, sore or injured toenail.

· Wear proper fitting shoes. Shoes that are too tight can cause ingrown toenails.  Shoes that are too loose can cause blisters and can be tripping hazards.

· Trim your toenails.  Don’t remove calluses yourself.

· Keep your feet clean and dry.  Use lotion to condition the feet from dry skin.

· Get your feet checked at your healthcare visit. 

· Keep the blood flowing.  Wiggle your toes and elevate your feet when you are sitting if possible.

· Choose activities that are easy on the feet:  Walking, riding a bike or swimming are a few.

If you are a diabetic, your foot care is extremely important.  Daily care is one of the best ways to prevent foot complications.  About fifty percent of people with diabetes have some kind of nerve damage in their feet.   This can lead to loss of feeling or numbness.  Nerve damage can lower your ability to feel pain, as well as heat or cold. 

No pain sounds great, but you may not feel blisters, sores, cuts or foot ulcers that can lead to bigger problems.   If untreated these can become infected and problematic.  If you get an infection this can spread and cause your toe or foot to become compromised.  Untreated infections can cause extensive damage that can lead to loss of a toe or part of a foot. 

Copperfield Hill has a monthly podiatry clinic.  Appointments are available in each building.  Sign up is available with the nursing office or concierge.  If you have questions, please contact our nursing staff.

More information at:  cdc.gov/diabetes/library/features/healthy-feet and mayoclinic.org

Walking is a great form of exercise for everyone!

Posted in General Information /Health Topics /Uncategorized /

ASK THE EXPERT // Music Therapy

What is Music Therapy?  It is the use of music to address the physical, emotional, cognitive and social needs of groups or individuals. 

Music can promote wellness, manage stress, alleviate pain, enhance memory, promote physical rehabilitation and improve communication.  Music Therapists utilize music and effectively help with the improvement of mental and physical health of individuals by using music therapy. 

The idea of music as a healing influence is as old as    ancient philosophy.  The modern birth of music therapy began after WWI and WWII when professional and   amateur musicians visited Veterans hospitals around the country.  Thousands of patients suffering with physical and emotional trauma from war responded to music.   This led doctors and nurses to request hiring of musicians by the hospitals.  It was soon evident that prior training before entering the hospitals would be of      benefit.  The first music therapy curriculum was founded at Michigan State University in 1944. 

Below is some information about Music Therapy.  We are grateful to have a Music Therapist on staff here at Copperfield Hill. 

· Music therapy is not just for people who are or were musicians. Anyone can have a connection with music and can benefit from music therapy.

· Music therapy can be used for people of all ages, from premature infants to older adults and everyone in between.

· Music therapy is a an evidence-based practice and rooted in research, just like physical, occupational and speech therapy.

· There are many different approaches and methods of music therapy.  However, all music therapy is grounded in three main principles: client preference, clinical expertise, and best available research.

· Music can be used by many individuals in ways that make us feel better, but that does not mean it is music therapy. In order to be considered music therapy, it must be performed by a board certified music therapist in a formal setting in which the music therapist and patient/client use music to work toward accomplishing specific goals. (This is the main misconception)

· While recorded music can be used for music therapy, live music is best for accomplishing most goals addressed in music therapy.

* Copperfield Hill’s Music Therapist, Bailey Blatchley, MT-BC contributed to this article.  Learn more at musictherapy.org

Posted in General Information /Health Topics /Human Interest /Spiritual Well Being /Uncategorized /

ASK THE EXPERT // Healthy Lungs

November is National Lung Cancer Awareness Month.  Many times what helps a movement, is just the simple part of getting the word out.  The American Lung Association’s Lung Force initiative is uniting women, men and caregivers to stand together in the fight against lung cancer. It is only with critical awareness that we can turn the tide against this life threatening disease. 

We take our lungs for granted.  Our bodies have natural defense systems to protect our lungs.  But the ALA suggests some ways to keep your lungs healthy.

1. Don’t Smoke—This is the major cause of lung cancer and COPD.  Cigarette smoke narrows the air ways in the lungs and causes chronic inflammation (swelling) in the lung.  If you smoke, quit.  Its never too late to benefit from quitting.

2. Avoid Exposure to Outdoor Air Pollution—Air quality can vary from day to day.  Knowing how this can affect your health and implementing useful strategies to minimize prolonged exposure can help keep you (and your family) well.  For example, the recent smoke from wild fires is one example of outdoor air pollution.

3. Prevent Infections—This is as simple as practicing good hygiene.  Wash your hands to prevent unwanted germs.  Avoid crowed places during cold and flu season.  Good oral hygiene is important, too.  Talk to your doctor about getting an influenza vaccination, pneumonia vaccination and the COVID-19 vaccine if it is the right thing for you.  These are effective tools to prevent severe illness. 

4. Get Regular Check-ups—Prevention and early detection of any illness is a strong way to avoid and fight disease. 

5. Exercise—It doesn’t matter your age or ability, being physically active can keep your lungs healthy.  Mild to moderate exercise not only can make you feel better, it can make a big difference in your overall health.

6. Breathe—Breathing exercises and deep breathing can help with your overall lung health.

Learn more at:  www.lung.org, rush.edu

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The Tooth Brush – A History

October is National Oral Hygiene Month

The modern toothbrush was invented in 1938.  Early forms of a “tooth brush” date to 3000 BC.  Ancient people used a “chew stick”,  a stick that someone would chew on until it became frayed.  The sticks were rubbed against the teeth.

The bristle toothbrush was invented in the mid 1400’s in China.  With handles of bamboo or bone, the bristles were usually taken from an animal with coarse hair.  Boar bristles were often used.  With the invention of plastics in the late 1930’s, nylon bristles were introduced.  The first commercial tooth brush was called Doctor West’s Miracle Toothbrush.  Disciplined oral hygiene became more of a practice in the 1940’s.  This was due to the disciplined hygiene habits of WWII soldiers.

The first American to patent a toothbrush was H. N. Wadsworth, (patent #18,653) on Nov. 7, 1857.  One of the first electric toothbrushes to hit the American market was in 1960. It was marketed by the Squibb company under the name Broxodent.toothbrush

Sources: loc.gov, colgate.com and history.com

 

Posted in Fun Facts /General Information /Health Topics /Uncategorized /

Ask the Expert

October is National Oral Hygiene Month

Dental

We take note of what dental hygienists do and raise awareness of the importance of good oral hygiene and oral health.

It does not matter what age you are, oral hygiene is very important to your overall health. The following are five issues that dental hygienists address: Periodontal Disease, Teeth Whitening, General Oral Care, Cavities and Inflammation

Everyone loves a clean mouth. So, here are the basic steps to keep it clean and healthy!

Floss Daily – There are places a tooth brush just can’t reach.

Brush Twice Daily – Morning and night, brush for two minutes to prevent cavities and gum disease.

Rinse with Mouth Wash – Not only does this keep your mouth clean, it does wonders for your breath.

Question: What is the connection between oral health and overall health?

The mouth is loaded with bacteria. Most of it is harmless, but your mouth is an entry point for your respiratory and digestive systems. Sometimes, harmful bacteria can enter your system and cause disease.

⇒ The body’s natural defense system is strong. Most the time this defense system and good oral hygiene are enough to keep harmful bacteria at bay. But, if you don’t practice good oral hygiene, bacteria can reach high levels causing infections in your mouth that can lead to gum disease and tooth decay.

⇒ Various diseases such as Endocarditis, Cardiovascular Disease and Pneumonia have been linked to poor oral hygiene.

⇒ Conditions that might affect your overall oral health can include: Diabetes, Osteoporosis and Alzheimer’s Disease. Diabetes can put your gums at risk, Osteoporosis can cause weakening of the jaw bone and tooth loss and Alzheimer’s disease can diminish the ability for one to maintain their own oral hygiene.

Eating a healthy diet and limiting added sugar is also helpful. Avoiding tobacco use will also increase the general health of your gums and mouth. Don’t forget to keep a regular schedule of visiting your dentist and oral hygienist. Contacting your oral health professional as soon as you see a problem will help keep a small problem from getting bigger.

 

*Sources: mayoclinic.org, adha.org, nationaltoday.com

 

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Reminiscing on Back to School

On August 24th, residents had the opportunity to assist Pastor Jan in filling backpacks for five neighborhood schools within the Robbinsdale School District: Forest Elementary, Lakeview Elementary, Meadow Lake Elementary, Neill Elementary and Northport Elementary.

After packing up the backpacks, a number of residents sat and reminisced about what they remember about the first day of school.  These are sure to be memories many of us share.

“I remember that we always took a picture, every year in the same spot.  So we could have a record of how the children grew!”

“The kids walked to school, they didn’t ride the bus.  They walked home for lunch, too.”  If they didn’t walk home for lunch, we packed a lunch.”

“We did our back to school clothes shopping at Sears, and school supplies we purchased at K-Mart.  Back then, there was no Target.”

“I always sewed the kids clothes.  I made the waistbands with elastic so they would get longer use out of them.  The kids would ask, “when can we have clothes that don’t have an elastic waist?”

“Hair cuts were either at the barber shop or in our kitchen.  We trimmed their bangs, you could tell the ones who trimmed their own bangs!”

Backpack2

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