The Different Types of Grief

August is National Grief Month.  Last week our Pastor, Jan Hartsook talked about grief.  She touched on the different things that can cause us grief and the stages that many go through to work through grief.  Here is a little more information about some types of grief.*

• Normal/Common Grief – Many people cope with grief and carry on a normal daily routine despite their grief.  Under the surface, an individual may be grieving and experiencing intense feelings of grief at different times.  However, on the surface, they seem like they are carrying on as normal.

• Complicated Grief – this is grief such that it actually keeps the individual from carrying on their daily lives.  It can lead to irrational thoughts and avoidance behaviors, like avoiding anything that reminds the griever of their loss.  This can feel like a constant presence making one feel boxed in by the grief.

• Inhibited Grief – To avoid pain, some avoid facing the reality of their loss.  They might throw all their energy into something else; avoiding the grief to avoid the pain.  On occasion, inhibited grief can lead to physical problems like headaches, loss of sleep or digestive issues.

• Disenfranchised Grief – We grieve for many things and this is where disenfranchised grief can appear.  Losing something that does not seem worthy of grief, to others, can put more pressure on the griever to push down or suppress their feelings.  Loss of a pet, a job, someone we don’t actually know, these are all examples.

• Absent Grief – Similar to Inhibited Grief, this happens when feelings are silenced and pushed down.  When people act as if nothing has happened it can lead to denial and avoidance.

• Anticipatory Grief – This is when someone starts to feel grief before loss actually happens.   An example is when you know someone who has a terminal disease, and the emotion of grief begins before they pass away.

• Exaggerated Grief – This type of grief is similar to complicated grief where sorrow and the inability to function don’t improve over time.  Sometimes this happens if someone experiences more than one loss at a time or in a short period of time.  Life feels overwhelming and makes it hard for the griever to cope.

• Cumulative Grief – When there are multiple losses in a short period of time, this can cause cumulative grief.

• Delayed Grief – This is just as described, when feelings of grief don’t appear immediately.  It is possible that pent up feelings of grief can get stronger over time, making it more difficult to cope later than after the initial situation causing the grief.

• Collective Grief – This is a type of grief that is experienced by a group of people.  It might be someone in the public eye, like a political leader or celebrity that people are mourning.  It could also be something that comes as a large event like an earthquake, fire or other natural disaster.

Experiencing grief is a common experience.  We all experience grief, we just don’t all do it in the same way.  There is no one way to experience grief.  Individuals need to be able to recognize and be aware of what is causing them grief and then find the best ways to process it in a healthy and healing way.  Understanding the different types of grief might be of help when we are trying to process grief for ourselves, or when we are helping a loved one with their grief.

 

*Used as resources here, there are many, many resources for information about grief:  happiness.com, knowyourgrief.org, grief.com, mayoclinic.org, psychologytoday.com, health.com

Posted in General Information /Health Topics /Spiritual Well Being /

Diet Choices That Can Boost Sleep Quality

Diet-and-Exercise-and-Sleep

In March we welcome the change of seasons. We are excited to say goodbye to winter and the cold weather. With the promise of Summer on the horizon, many people are refocusing their attention on their health and wellness journey.  This often includes attention to your diet, which can help with better weight management.

If you are seeking to make changes to your nutrition and diet, sleep plays an important factor in being successful.  Many of us feel especially sluggish after the winter hibernation. In addition, we experienced the change of our clocks. We jumped ahead one hour due to Daylight Savings. The National Sleep Foundation has claimed the week after Daylight Savings to be Sleep Awareness Week. In 2021, Sleep Awareness Week is dated March 14th through March 20th.

We have compiled a few options on how to achieve a better night’s sleep through our nutrition choices during the day.

Fruits – An important piece for any diet, but when we are speaking about sleep specifically, look at eating more cherries or kiwis. Cherries have been found to help decrease the effects of insomnia. Cherries contain a high amount of the sleep-promoting hormone, melatonin. Eating kiwis two hours before bed has been found to help with falling asleep faster, staying asleep longer and waking up less frequently.

Caffeine – Most of us know to avoid caffeine before bed. The rule is to avoid caffeine 5 to 6 hours before bed. Caffeine can be tricky because it can also be found in the foods we consume, it’s not limited to beverages like coffee or soda.

Snacking – Avoid late night snacking. Try to stop eating 2 to 3 hours before you go to bed. Snacking can lead to broken sleep, individuals find themselves waking up more frequently during the night.

Spicy food – Eating spicy food can cause heartburn which can impact your sleep. Acid reflux can worsen and irritate an individual’s airways. Avoid consuming spicy foods within 3 hours of going to bed.

Alcohol – Drinking alcohol before bed is typically not the best choice. Alcohol is a sedative and it may help you fall asleep, but it reduces the overall quality of sleep you receive. Most people find themselves waking up more frequently during the night.

Sources: Sleep.org and Hopkinsmedicine.org

Posted in Fun Facts /General Information /Health Topics /Uncategorized /

The History of Friday the 13th

Friday, November 13, 2020

In a good year, Friday the 13th carries its reputation of bad luck. In a pandemic year, who knows what it will bring.

The origins of the Western fear of the number 13 is unclear. Some date it back to a Norse myth about 12 gods having a dinner party and a 13th uninvited guest arrives.  Others relate the fear of the number 13 to the Code of Hammurabi. The Code allegedly missed a 13th law from its list of legal rules. This event is commonly viewed as simply, a clerical error. However, superstitious people will point to this as proof of 13’s longstanding negative associations. There is a biblical theory as well.  The Last Supper was attended by 13 guests.  Jesus and his 12 apostles attended and one of those apostles went on to betray Jesus.

Why Friday though? Most people look forward to Friday every week. It is the sign of another work week done and ushers in the happiness of the weekend. The negative association with Friday is linked to religious and cultural origins. Biblically, Friday is seen to be more ominous because it is the day Jesus was crucified.

Friday and the number 13, how did these two “unlucky” things get paired together? There are infinite theories and most have been dismissed. Friday the 13th really gained attention and hysteria in the 20th century.  An author by the name of Thomas Lawson published a book titled, Friday, the Thirteenth, which is about a stockbroker who deliberately chooses to crash the stock market on this given date. The following year, the New York Times became one of the first channels to recognize the superstition. Fast forward to the 1980’s when a new movie franchise was born. It featured the anti-hero, Jason Voorhees terrorizing infamous Camp Crystal Lake. “Friday the 13th” became a popular culture phenomenon and added to the superstitions attached to the date.

Fri13

Sources: wikipedia.com, History.com and CNN.com

 

Posted in Fun Facts /General Information /global interest /History /