How We Got Through It

In March of 2020, we could never have imagined what lay ahead for our world and our community. As we look back on the past sixteen months, we can see an evolution. Navigating the uncertain waters of the pandemic will no doubt be remembered as the biggest challenge we know. Our reactions, teamwork, attitudes, sense of humor and determination are all pieces of the puzzle that when put together, pulled us through. We all looked out for our neighbors, co-workers and all the individuals who support Copperfield Hill. We learned a lot and as we creep back to normalcy, when asked what helped us get through, residents and staff gave us their thoughts:

♥ Activities with Beth and Erin

♥ Staying in touch with people through work, seeing family, time with my husband, Zoom/phone calls and prayer time with God

♥ Essential Caregivers, my car, activities

♥ Allowing me to move in to Copperfield Hill during the pandemic

♥ Daily Delights and the activities cart that visited the apartments, weekly COVID updates were informative and encouraging, the staff> Calmness and support from the residents, they endured a lot and it was done with kindness

♥ Faith in God

♥ Family support of my belief to wear a mask and follow mandates

♥ Prayers, thank you notes/emails from residents and families

♥ Painting my house, yard work and watching Netflix with family

♥ Family, friends, my dog and lots of good books

♥ My strong faith in Christ and love for helping people

Our lives were all changed, but the main comment in regards to what got us through, was the presence of human connection. That is something we have and cherish at Copperfield Hill!

Posted in About Us /Activities /General Information /global interest /Health Topics /Spiritual Well Being /

How to help break the stigma of mental illness

May is Mental Health Awareness Month, but what do we mean by mental health?

As discussed in an article by the The Mayo Clinic*, “Mental health is the overall wellness of how you think, regulate your feelings and behave.”

At times, physical illness, environmental stresses or a change in one’s personal situation can cause a disruption or interference with individual thought process and mental functioning. This is what can cause our mental wellness to be compromised.  Being aware of changes and recognizing signs that someone might be experiencing challenges with their mental health is helpful for all involved.  Here are a few things to keep in mind:

Openly talk about mental health – Break the stigma about talking about mental health issues.   Common and treatable, more people suffer from mental health then you may be aware.

Educate yourself – There are plenty of resources accessible to learn more about specific types of mental illnesses, treatments and support.  Talk to your health professional, visit the library or online resources.

Be aware of the language you use – The language we choose to use matters. Do not use insulting terms (ex. “Crazy” or “Psycho”). Identify the person first, not the illness. (ex. My brother who struggles with OCD vs. My OCD brother).

Show compassion towards those with mental illness – Be supportive to people with mental health conditions. Check in frequently, provide support and encouragement.

Speak up against the stigma - Be positive.  Don’t sit by idly as others pass judgements or speak in a derogatory manner.

 

Great resources to educate yourself about mental health:

www.nami.org

www.thedepressionproject.com

www.mayoclinic.org

www.mentalhealthmn.org

www.mn.gov

www.nimh.nih.gov

Sources: https://www.centracare.com/blog/2019/may/break-the-stigma/
*https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/adult-health/in-depth/mental-health/art-20044098

 

Posted in General Information /Health Topics /Uncategorized /

Signs You Should Check On A Loved One’s Mental Health

May is National Mental Health Awareness Month – What better time to touch base with a friend, neighbor or family member who might be experiencing stress in their life.  The path to obtaining the help one might need starts with the recognition that there is an issue, open and honest discussion and reaching out to those appropriate providers who can help with treatment towards improved well being.

Below are some of the most common signs that someone might be experiencing challenges with their mental and/or physical health.  It is always recommended to seek out professional help and consultation.  Consulting  your primary care team is a great place to start.

1. Becoming socially withdrawn

2. Experiencing difficult life events

3. Reckless behavior

4. Changes in sleeping habits or experiencing difficulties sleeping

5. Changes in eating habits

6. They constantly express being “busy” or overwhelmed by things

7. They are acting out of character

8. They are emotionally distant

9. Loss of concentration and/or ability to focus

10. Excessive worrying or fear

11. Changes in libido or sexual drive

12. Physical ailments without an obvious cause, examples:   headaches, stomach aches and elusive body “aches and pains”

13. Losing interest in leisure activities

14. Prolonged feelings of irritability

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To learn more about the signs of mental health and to find resources about mental health:

National Alliance on Mental Illness

The Depression Project

 

 

Posted in General Information /global interest /Health Topics /Uncategorized /

May is…

National Mental Health Awareness Month

May-is-Mental-Health-Awareness-Month-blog

May is National Mental Health Awareness Month. Our mental health is just as important as our physical health. This year, the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) if focusing on the message that no person experiencing mental health challenges should feel alone. There is a large percentage of individuals experiencing mental health concerns that will be coming to the forefront due to the many pressures and stresses of the pandemic. Mental health awareness is important and needs to be addressed and improved for all.

The American Psychiatric Association reports that close to half of people with mental illness do not receive treatment. Fearing stigma, prejudice and possible discrimination, many fear they will lose their jobs, friends and will just be treated differently. Stigma and prejudice usually come from lack of knowledge about mental illness, misinformation and inaccurate media representations. Many have a negative view even though they might know about the medical factors and general nature of some mental health disorders. Stigma comes in many forms and it can be public, self or institutional.

The most important message is that stigma and discrimination can contribute to the reduced likelihood of someone getting treatment. Low self-esteem, loss of hope, difficulties with social relationships are all gateways to difficulties at home and work and the likelihood of getting and maintaining treatment.

Open, honest discussion, showing compassion and educating oneself about mental illness goes a long way to crushing the stigma. This opens up opportunities for those suffering to be more receptive to treatment and a healthier life.

Many organizations offer education and training on identifying how to address the issues of mental illness and the stigma that can come with it. Seeking out help from a mental health professional is key to diagnosing mental health conditions. A psychiatrist, psychologist, clinical social worker or other mental health professional along with your primary care doctor can be involved with diagnostic assessments and referrals for treatment.

 

*Learn more at: psychiatry.org, nami.org, mayoclinic.org

 

Posted in General Information /Health Topics /Human Interest /