Let’s March into Spring HEALTHIER

March is

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National Nutrition Month was created by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. The month focuses on helping people make informed and healthy food choices. They focus on developing better eating habits and healthy physical activities. Many common health problems can be prevented by taking charge of your diet and exercise. Paying attention to what you eat and drink and physical movement are two of the biggest ways you can take control of your health.

Common health problems that can positively benefit from a good eating regime are many. At any age it is important to pay attention to what you eat and the quantity. Our diet contributes to our overall well being.

Diabetes is a long lasting disease that affects how your body turns food into energy. There are different types of Diabetes. Over 34 million people live with diabetes and over 85 million live with prediabetes. Most of the food we eat is broken down into sugar (glucose) and released into our bloodstream. When your blood sugar goes up, your pancreas is signaled to release insulin. Insulin acts like a key to let the blood sugar into your body’s cells for use as energy. With diabetes, your body doesn’t make insulin or can’t use it properly. Over time, serious health problems can develop, such as heart disease, kidney disease and vision loss.

Living with diabetes can be a challenge. But one can do a lot of good by eating well and staying active. A healthy diet that includes a balance of nutrient rich foods is extremely important. Balancing your blood sugar is the key to staying well. Knowledge is power, so here’s a list of things to help create a healthy eating plan.

Meal Planning - Make a plan so you are not caught without the proper foods to sustain your health

Grocery Shopping - Helps keep you on track with your meal plans

Read Food Labels - Know the nutritional value of the food you purchase

Eating Out - Have a plan before you go to a restaurant, choose wisely

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Learn much, much more at: mayoclinic.org, cdc.org, diabetes.org, eatingwell.org