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Reminiscing on Back to School

On August 24th, residents had the opportunity to assist Pastor Jan in filling backpacks for five neighborhood schools within the Robbinsdale School District: Forest Elementary, Lakeview Elementary, Meadow Lake Elementary, Neill Elementary and Northport Elementary.

After packing up the backpacks, a number of residents sat and reminisced about what they remember about the first day of school.  These are sure to be memories many of us share.

“I remember that we always took a picture, every year in the same spot.  So we could have a record of how the children grew!”

“The kids walked to school, they didn’t ride the bus.  They walked home for lunch, too.”  If they didn’t walk home for lunch, we packed a lunch.”

“We did our back to school clothes shopping at Sears, and school supplies we purchased at K-Mart.  Back then, there was no Target.”

“I always sewed the kids clothes.  I made the waistbands with elastic so they would get longer use out of them.  The kids would ask, “when can we have clothes that don’t have an elastic waist?”

“Hair cuts were either at the barber shop or in our kitchen.  We trimmed their bangs, you could tell the ones who trimmed their own bangs!”

Backpack2

Posted in General Information /Spiritual Well Being /Uncategorized /

The Different Types of Grief

August is National Grief Month.  Last week our Pastor, Jan Hartsook talked about grief.  She touched on the different things that can cause us grief and the stages that many go through to work through grief.  Here is a little more information about some types of grief.*

• Normal/Common Grief – Many people cope with grief and carry on a normal daily routine despite their grief.  Under the surface, an individual may be grieving and experiencing intense feelings of grief at different times.  However, on the surface, they seem like they are carrying on as normal.

• Complicated Grief – this is grief such that it actually keeps the individual from carrying on their daily lives.  It can lead to irrational thoughts and avoidance behaviors, like avoiding anything that reminds the griever of their loss.  This can feel like a constant presence making one feel boxed in by the grief.

• Inhibited Grief – To avoid pain, some avoid facing the reality of their loss.  They might throw all their energy into something else; avoiding the grief to avoid the pain.  On occasion, inhibited grief can lead to physical problems like headaches, loss of sleep or digestive issues.

• Disenfranchised Grief – We grieve for many things and this is where disenfranchised grief can appear.  Losing something that does not seem worthy of grief, to others, can put more pressure on the griever to push down or suppress their feelings.  Loss of a pet, a job, someone we don’t actually know, these are all examples.

• Absent Grief – Similar to Inhibited Grief, this happens when feelings are silenced and pushed down.  When people act as if nothing has happened it can lead to denial and avoidance.

• Anticipatory Grief – This is when someone starts to feel grief before loss actually happens.   An example is when you know someone who has a terminal disease, and the emotion of grief begins before they pass away.

• Exaggerated Grief – This type of grief is similar to complicated grief where sorrow and the inability to function don’t improve over time.  Sometimes this happens if someone experiences more than one loss at a time or in a short period of time.  Life feels overwhelming and makes it hard for the griever to cope.

• Cumulative Grief – When there are multiple losses in a short period of time, this can cause cumulative grief.

• Delayed Grief – This is just as described, when feelings of grief don’t appear immediately.  It is possible that pent up feelings of grief can get stronger over time, making it more difficult to cope later than after the initial situation causing the grief.

• Collective Grief – This is a type of grief that is experienced by a group of people.  It might be someone in the public eye, like a political leader or celebrity that people are mourning.  It could also be something that comes as a large event like an earthquake, fire or other natural disaster.

Experiencing grief is a common experience.  We all experience grief, we just don’t all do it in the same way.  There is no one way to experience grief.  Individuals need to be able to recognize and be aware of what is causing them grief and then find the best ways to process it in a healthy and healing way.  Understanding the different types of grief might be of help when we are trying to process grief for ourselves, or when we are helping a loved one with their grief.

 

*Used as resources here, there are many, many resources for information about grief:  happiness.com, knowyourgrief.org, grief.com, mayoclinic.org, psychologytoday.com, health.com

Posted in General Information /Health Topics /Spiritual Well Being /

A Message from Pastor Jan

A Message from Jan Hartsook, Pastor at Copperfield Hill

August is National Grief Awareness Month. All people at some time in their lives will experience grief. It is a normal human emotion. Yet, grief comes not only as a result of the death of someone we care about, but, can also be experienced at other kinds of losses. These losses may include: loss of a relationship, loss of a job, financial losses, deteriorating health, moving, loss of a pet, a betrayal by someone you had trusted and concern for a child/teenager.

When experiencing grief, most people will go through a normal series of stages: shock, guilt, anger and bargaining, depression, acceptance (working through the grief) and finally hope.

The time it takes to move through these stages is different for each person. Some may return to previous stages before moving on with hope. Grief takes time to heal. Some people find that seeing a doctor, therapist, joining a grief support group or talking to a good listener whom they trust, to be helpful.

~Pastor Jan

 

Pastor Jan holds a monthly Grief Support Group on the first Tuesday of the month at Copperfield Hill.

 

Pastor Jan1

Posted in Uncategorized /

The Tokyo 2020 Olympics

The Tokyo 2020 Olympics are officially underway, in 2021! Originally set for July 24, 2020 the games were postponed due to concerns over Covid-19. However, today, with limited guests present, the games official opening ceremony took place. Hosted in Tokyo, Japan, the games have never been postponed. So the decision to postpone the games and push them to 2021 was the first of its kind in Olympic history. The games, however, have been cancelled due to World Wars in 1916, 1940 and 1944.

The IOC president, Thomas Bach, opened the games with the following words: “the pandemic forced us apart, to keep our distance from each other, to stay away even from our loved ones. This separation made this tunnel so dark. But today, wherever in the world you may be, we are united in sharing this moment together.” Bach commented that the opening ceremony was “a moment of hope,” and he welcomed and praised the athletes for overcoming the great challenges that led them to participate.

There are many ways to watch the Tokyo Olympics, try your local coverage and other streaming services. The Tokyo 2020 Summer Olympics run from July 23, 2021 to August 8, 2021. Over 11,000 athletes will participate from 205 nations.

Posted in Uncategorized /

How We Got Through It

In March of 2020, we could never have imagined what lay ahead for our world and our community. As we look back on the past sixteen months, we can see an evolution. Navigating the uncertain waters of the pandemic will no doubt be remembered as the biggest challenge we know. Our reactions, teamwork, attitudes, sense of humor and determination are all pieces of the puzzle that when put together, pulled us through. We all looked out for our neighbors, co-workers and all the individuals who support Copperfield Hill. We learned a lot and as we creep back to normalcy, when asked what helped us get through, residents and staff gave us their thoughts:

♥ Activities with Beth and Erin

♥ Staying in touch with people through work, seeing family, time with my husband, Zoom/phone calls and prayer time with God

♥ Essential Caregivers, my car, activities

♥ Allowing me to move in to Copperfield Hill during the pandemic

♥ Daily Delights and the activities cart that visited the apartments, weekly COVID updates were informative and encouraging, the staff> Calmness and support from the residents, they endured a lot and it was done with kindness

♥ Faith in God

♥ Family support of my belief to wear a mask and follow mandates

♥ Prayers, thank you notes/emails from residents and families

♥ Painting my house, yard work and watching Netflix with family

♥ Family, friends, my dog and lots of good books

♥ My strong faith in Christ and love for helping people

Our lives were all changed, but the main comment in regards to what got us through, was the presence of human connection. That is something we have and cherish at Copperfield Hill!

Posted in About Us /Activities /General Information /global interest /Health Topics /Spiritual Well Being /

Ask the Expert//

How to Sleep Better

sleep

We have all been there.  We dread going to bed because we don’t sleep well and never get enough sleep to feel rested.  How can we break this cycle?

Sleep is one of the most important components of a healthy lifestyle.  Adults should try to get 7-8 hours of sleep each night.  Proper sleep is what recharges your system, your brain in particular.  It helps our immune systems, metabolism, heart health, creativity, vitality and even our weight.

Losing even an hour of sleep per night can cause problems.  It doesn’t just mean a tired morning.  “ A good night’s sleep begins each morning,” says local wellness coach, Janet Johnson.  “When we sleep, our bodies do the important work of cleaning and repairing our brain and body,” adds Johnson.  Ultimately our daily habits contribute to a good night’s sleep.  The following are sleep well tips Johnson shares:

► Go to bed and get up at the same time every night/morning.  Consistent wake times and bedtimes will enable your body to get into a regular rhythm for sleep.

► Go outside for at least 10 minutes in the morning.  Look toward, but not at, the morning sun.  The yellow blue contrast rays of the morning sun will reset your circadian rhythm.  This helps produce melatonin for sleep 14-16 hours later.

► Do some physical activity in the morning or midday to stimulate your brain and body.

► Stop caffeine after 2pm.  Caffeine has a half-life of 7 hours.  If you have coffee at 3pm, half of the stimulating caffeine will still be in your body at 10pm.

► Wind down before bed.  Create a calming pre-bedtime routine.  Quiet activities, such as reading and meditation are good ways to start a restful transition to sleep.  Avoid TV, computers and your smart phone before bed.

► Avoid alcohol and large meals in the evening.  Alcohol may seem like a good idea but even a small amount makes it harder to stay asleep.  Eating a big meal at night can also interrupt sleep.  If our bodies have to focus on digesting a late dinner or snack, we won’t get all the cleaning and repairing that our brain/body needs.

 

What is Circadian Rhythm?

Circadian rhythms are 24-hour cycles that are part of the body’s internal clock. They help the body carry out essential functions and processes. One of the most important and well-known circadian rhythm is the sleep /wake cycle.

 

Sources: nia.nih.gov, helpguide.org, janetjohnsonwellness.com, sleepfoundation.org 

 

Posted in General Information /Health Topics /Uncategorized /

ASK THE EXPERT // Independent Living and Assisted Living

 

Key Differences  Between Independent and Assisted Living

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“We moved into Copperfield Hill a little over a year ago. We were immediately struck by the friendliness of residents and the kindness of staff. It is clear that the staff works hard ever day to make Copperfield Hill a pleasant, nurturing and fun place to live.”

~Copperfield Hill Resident

Whether you are familiar with senior housing or you are just starting to explore your options, it can become overwhelming to dissect the variety of housing options for a 55+ community. Your first step in seeking a new home is to start by asking some questions on how your current day to day activities look.

• Do you desire to join friends for a meal?
• Do you enjoy attending exercise classes and cards?
• Do you want the freedom of having no home maintenance?
• Are you worried about falling in your home without the ability to reach help in a timely fashion?

By answering a few questions, you can start to sift through the best option to suit your wants and needs.

Independent Living is in an apartment-style community. Residents can choose from a one or two bedroom apartment with a full size kitchen. A full time staff is dedicated to providing assistance towards maintaining independence. A maintenance team is built in to assist in home repairs to ease the worries of maintaining a home. The recreation team is charged with creating an array of socialization opportunities:  exercise classes, card clubs, happy hours and scheduled outings. Our dining room is available seven days a week for a continental breakfast with additional meals for lunch and/or dinner with a full menu.

The term Assisted Living has created confusion for many families. Assisted Living is a benefit to allow residents to still live on their own, however, they are requiring some assistance to maintain their independence. Our team is built in and on-site 24 hours a day. The consistency and reassurance of a staff to aid in your safety is a key benefit of Assisted Living. All the benefits of socialization and transportation with Independent Living are consistent in Assisted Living.

Assisted Living Services

• Bathing
• Dressing
• Laundry
• Medication Mgmt.
• Emergency Pendant
• Three meals per day
• Medical staff 24 hours
• Diabetic Mgmt.
• Oxygen Mgmt.

Copperfield Hill creates a customized approach to our senior community. Our  specialized team will be able to sift through your desires and concerns to create a solution to keep you independent, while addressing your needs for safety.

Call 763.277.1008 or email to sprice@copperfieldhill.com to start the conversation.

 

Posted in About Us /Assisted Living /General Information /Independent Living /Nursing /Senior Living /

How to help break the stigma of mental illness

May is Mental Health Awareness Month, but what do we mean by mental health?

As discussed in an article by the The Mayo Clinic*, “Mental health is the overall wellness of how you think, regulate your feelings and behave.”

At times, physical illness, environmental stresses or a change in one’s personal situation can cause a disruption or interference with individual thought process and mental functioning. This is what can cause our mental wellness to be compromised.  Being aware of changes and recognizing signs that someone might be experiencing challenges with their mental health is helpful for all involved.  Here are a few things to keep in mind:

Openly talk about mental health – Break the stigma about talking about mental health issues.   Common and treatable, more people suffer from mental health then you may be aware.

Educate yourself – There are plenty of resources accessible to learn more about specific types of mental illnesses, treatments and support.  Talk to your health professional, visit the library or online resources.

Be aware of the language you use – The language we choose to use matters. Do not use insulting terms (ex. “Crazy” or “Psycho”). Identify the person first, not the illness. (ex. My brother who struggles with OCD vs. My OCD brother).

Show compassion towards those with mental illness – Be supportive to people with mental health conditions. Check in frequently, provide support and encouragement.

Speak up against the stigma - Be positive.  Don’t sit by idly as others pass judgements or speak in a derogatory manner.

 

Great resources to educate yourself about mental health:

www.nami.org

www.thedepressionproject.com

www.mayoclinic.org

www.mentalhealthmn.org

www.mn.gov

www.nimh.nih.gov

Sources: https://www.centracare.com/blog/2019/may/break-the-stigma/
*https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/adult-health/in-depth/mental-health/art-20044098

 

Posted in General Information /Health Topics /Uncategorized /

Signs You Should Check On A Loved One’s Mental Health

May is National Mental Health Awareness Month – What better time to touch base with a friend, neighbor or family member who might be experiencing stress in their life.  The path to obtaining the help one might need starts with the recognition that there is an issue, open and honest discussion and reaching out to those appropriate providers who can help with treatment towards improved well being.

Below are some of the most common signs that someone might be experiencing challenges with their mental and/or physical health.  It is always recommended to seek out professional help and consultation.  Consulting  your primary care team is a great place to start.

1. Becoming socially withdrawn

2. Experiencing difficult life events

3. Reckless behavior

4. Changes in sleeping habits or experiencing difficulties sleeping

5. Changes in eating habits

6. They constantly express being “busy” or overwhelmed by things

7. They are acting out of character

8. They are emotionally distant

9. Loss of concentration and/or ability to focus

10. Excessive worrying or fear

11. Changes in libido or sexual drive

12. Physical ailments without an obvious cause, examples:   headaches, stomach aches and elusive body “aches and pains”

13. Losing interest in leisure activities

14. Prolonged feelings of irritability

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To learn more about the signs of mental health and to find resources about mental health:

National Alliance on Mental Illness

The Depression Project

 

 

Posted in General Information /global interest /Health Topics /Uncategorized /

May is…

National Mental Health Awareness Month

May-is-Mental-Health-Awareness-Month-blog

May is National Mental Health Awareness Month. Our mental health is just as important as our physical health. This year, the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) if focusing on the message that no person experiencing mental health challenges should feel alone. There is a large percentage of individuals experiencing mental health concerns that will be coming to the forefront due to the many pressures and stresses of the pandemic. Mental health awareness is important and needs to be addressed and improved for all.

The American Psychiatric Association reports that close to half of people with mental illness do not receive treatment. Fearing stigma, prejudice and possible discrimination, many fear they will lose their jobs, friends and will just be treated differently. Stigma and prejudice usually come from lack of knowledge about mental illness, misinformation and inaccurate media representations. Many have a negative view even though they might know about the medical factors and general nature of some mental health disorders. Stigma comes in many forms and it can be public, self or institutional.

The most important message is that stigma and discrimination can contribute to the reduced likelihood of someone getting treatment. Low self-esteem, loss of hope, difficulties with social relationships are all gateways to difficulties at home and work and the likelihood of getting and maintaining treatment.

Open, honest discussion, showing compassion and educating oneself about mental illness goes a long way to crushing the stigma. This opens up opportunities for those suffering to be more receptive to treatment and a healthier life.

Many organizations offer education and training on identifying how to address the issues of mental illness and the stigma that can come with it. Seeking out help from a mental health professional is key to diagnosing mental health conditions. A psychiatrist, psychologist, clinical social worker or other mental health professional along with your primary care doctor can be involved with diagnostic assessments and referrals for treatment.

 

*Learn more at: psychiatry.org, nami.org, mayoclinic.org

 

Posted in General Information /Health Topics /Human Interest /