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Eye Health

Your eye health is an important part of your overall well-being. As we age, our eyesight can change. It is always a good idea to have an annual eye exam.

Included is a helpful “eye health” overview from AARP*. Vision services are available at Copperfield. If you have any questions, feel free to ask our staff.

*Below is a list of some common eye issues. If you have questions,  seek advice from your eye doctor.

 

  • Double Vision: Cover one eye, is the double vision still there? If yes, it might just be dryness. Using artificial tears to lubricate the eye may help.
  • Floaters and Flashes: With age, a gel like substance in your eye can liquefy and pull away from the retina causing dark moving spots or floaters. Many times this is not dangerous. However, if you see new floaters and flashes of light in your vision, this may be a sign of a retinal tear. You should contact your eye doctor.
  • Eyes Feel Dry: It might just be too much screen time. Take a break from the screens and use preservative free artificial tears.
  • Blurry Vision: You will need an eye exam to rule out certain problems. It may be that you just need a new eye glass prescription.
  • Loss of Peripheral Vision: A gradual loss can point to many things and should be followed up by your eye doctor as soon as possible.
  • Trouble Reading: This is called Presbyopia and occurs when the lens loses its ability to change shape and accommodate for close up vision. This naturally develops after about age 40. “Readers” may help, see your eye doctor. You may be a candidate for contacts.
  • Reduced Night Vision:   It could be uncorrected nearsightedness. You might need a new prescription.

 

*For more information: https://www.aarp.org/health/conditions-treatments/eye-center/

Posted in Uncategorized /

Winner – 2020 Readers’ Choice Awards

2020 RCA Ribbon

For the tenth year, Copperfield Hill has been named by the Sun Post’s Robbinsdale readership as the “Best” in the following categories:

  • Best Retirement Community
  • Best Assisted Living
  • Best Memory Care
  • Best Senior Apartments
  • Best Hair Salon
  • Best Place to Work

Over thirty years ago, the Farr family broke ground to create a nurturing and compelling place for seniors to call home. We continue that tradition. Thank you and congratulations to all of those whose everyday actions and loyalty have created the wonderful environment where we work and live.

 

Posted in About Us /Community Award /Community Living /Human Interest /Senior Living /Uncategorized /

Beating The Winter Blues

It’s that time of year again. Much shorter days, less natural sunlight and our coldest months (January and February) ahead of us. With this in mind, many people may be finding themselves feeling more isolated and even a bit blue. It’s not just the length of day, there is a direct relationship to the holidays and the amount of activity that tends to fall off after the festivities are over. What is it about this time of year that can have us feeling a bit off our game? What can we do about it?

Seasonal Affective Disorder or SAD is commonly referred to as the winter blues. It is a clinical diagnosis according to the National Institute of Health*. It occurs more commonly in the northern part of the country where it is colder.  Shorter days and less sunlight can cause the internal clock, or circadian rhythm, for someone to change. For many, the change can cause shifts in their melatonin levels, causing mood disruption.

To offset the lack of natural light, light therapy can help. The use of light therapy lamps is common to replace missing daylight hours.

Also, talking about how you feel with family, friends and health professionals can help offset the winter blues. Feeling “down” is not uncommon and talking about those feelings can help. Many times, just talking can help you recognize what might be bothering you and also help identify activities and behaviors that can help turn to a more positive outlook. Finding things that fill you with joy and a feeling of accomplishment can help tremendously.

Below are a few ideas to help with SAD:

  • Do something you enjoy.
  • Weather permitting, make sure when the sun is out, get out in it!
  • Spend time with people you enjoy. Family and friends help support one another.
  • Eat a balanced and nutritious diet.
  • Don’t expect change overnight. Your mood will change gradually with self-care and attention to what makes you feel better.

*Learn more at: NIH.gov, clevelandclinic.org and mayoclinic.org

Posted in Health Topics /

Happy New Year!

Happy New Year from your friends at Copperfield Hill.  We wish you good health and prosperity in 2020.

It’s a new year and a new decade.  Did you know that the United Nations (UN) designates specific years to mark particular events and topics to bring a greater awareness to a subject or organization?

2020 has been declared by the United Nations as the International Year of Plant Health*. The UN will continue to recognize and promote healthy ecosystems as key to sustainable development.

The American Phytopathological Society (APS) states the overall objective is to raise awareness of the importance of, and the impacts of plant health in regards to global issues, such as hunger, poverty, threats to environment and economic development. Healthy plants are vital to the overall health of an environment and biodiversity. Healthy plants are also key to sustaining a global food supply.

*More information at: UN.org and apsnet.org

Posted in global interest /Human Interest /

*Winter Solstice 2019: Dec. 21, 11:19 pm EST

Commonly referred to as the “shortest day of the year”, the Winter Solstice is an astronomical event. Occurring when the sun reaches the Tropic of Capricorn, we have our shortest day and longest night in the Northern Hemisphere. You may be in sunny and warm Florida or cold and snowy Minnesota, regardless, the Solstice marks the first day of winter. The Solstice, when the sun appears at its lowest in the sky, begins to reverse. This marks the hours of sunlight increasing and daylight becoming longer. In the Southern Hemisphere, the Summer Solstice happens simultaneously.

There are many different Winter Solstice celebrations around the globe. This event has played important roles in many cultures from ancient times to today. One such tradition is the Feast of Juul which is observed in Scandinavia. The Yule or Juul log was brought in and burned in honor of the Scandinavian god Thor. It was Thor’s job to bring the sun, and warmth it provided, back to the people. There are many rituals and customs that stem from this feast.

*Learn more at farmersalmanac.com

Posted in Human Interest /

December is Flu Fighting Month

December is all about staying healthy and fighting the flu. December 1-7, is National Hand Washing Awareness Week and Influenza Vaccination Week.

According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), the best way to prevent seasonal flu is to get vaccinated each year. This can be achieved by a visit to a variety of health providers. Your physician can normally provide a flu shot, but so can local pharmacies and clinics. Also, take actions daily, to stop the spread of harmful germs and thus the flu virus. Covering your nose and mouth when sneezing and coughing and washing your hands often are ways to prevent germs from spreading. If you do get sick, there are prescription medications called “antiviral drugs” that can be used to treat flu symptoms.

You can also avoid getting the flu by just taking good care of yourself. Eat a healthy diet and drink plenty of fluids. Consider cutting back on caffeine and alcohol which can cause dehydration.  Keep up your exercise routine. Just because it is cold outside does not mean quit moving.

Daily preventative actions can help fight illness. Keeping surfaces clean and disinfected is a sure way to kill household germs. Wipe down handles, faucets, phones, work surfaces that you touch often. Don’t forget your work environment and the car.

You can learn more at cdc.gov, mayoclinic.org and nih.gov

Posted in Health Topics /

The Holidays are almost here!

With 6 days until Thanksgiving and 32 days until Christmas, the holidays are coming.  While this time of year can be a time of celebration and great cheer, it can also be a source of stress.  Staying healthy during the holidays can be a challenge.  Here are a few tips:

Make Healthy Choices – It is easy to over indulge, try not to.  If you plan on a large Thanksgiving mid day meal, plan on a lighter meal for the evening.

Stay Hydrated – Drink plenty of water.  It is key to staying healthy.  Limit your consumption of caffeine and alcohol, both can lead to dehydration.

Stay Active – Be sure to keep up with your normal routines.  Invite friends and family to join you for a walk.  It is easy to dismiss keeping up with our daily routines with holiday distractions.

Take Time for Yourself – This time of year we get pulled in many directions.  It is easy to over extend while trying to keep up with all of the festivities of the season.  If you need time to rest and relax, make sure to do so.  Skipping a few activities here or there can contribute to enjoying your time with family and friends.

Get Enough Sleep – Getting enough sleep is key for our energy levels and keeping ourselves healthy.  When we don’t get enough sleep, it can cause changes in our body’s chemistry.  This can lead to anxiety, irritability and weight gain.  Seven or eight hours a night is best!

Get more information at:  cdc.gov, Forbes.com or health.harvard.edu

Posted in Health Topics /

Celebrating Veterans Day

Veterans Day gives Americans the opportunity to celebrate the bravery and sacrifice of all U.S. veterans. However, many Americans confuse this holiday with Memorial Day.

Veterans Day was first known as Armistice Day. The holiday was established as a legal U.S. holiday to honor the end of World War I.  November 11, 1918 marked the end of WWI, but it was not until 1938 for legislation to be passed in recognition of the holiday.   Veterans Day was established as a U.S. Holiday on November 11th.

In 1954, the United States had been through two World Wars and the Korean War. At that time, Congress strongly recommended the veterans service organizations to amend the word “Armistice” to the word “Veterans”. Thus the holiday was known as Veterans Day. In the late 60’s the November 11th date was changed to ensure federal employees a three day weekend holiday. Thus, Veterans Day was moved to the fourth Monday of October. This caused confusion and disagreement among those who believed the original November 11th date should be honored. So, in 1975, President Gerald Ford signed a law to return Veterans Day to the original date of November 11. Since then, it has been celebrated on November 11.

While Memorial Day honors service members who died in service to their country, deceased veterans are honored on Veterans Day. Veterans Day is set aside to thank and honor the living veterans who served honorably in the military, in both wartime and peacetime. This history is important so that we can honor our current and former service members appropriately.

Veterans Day is observed across the country with many different events. Special programs and honor ceremonies, parades, wreath laying ceremonies along with many private businesses offering special value promotions for veterans and their families.

 

Learn more are at: military.com, va.gov, defense.gov

Posted in veterans /Veterans Day /

November is National Alzheimer’s Disease Awareness Month

President Ronald Reagan designated the month of November as Alzheimer’s Awareness Month in 1983. At that time, less than two million people suffered with the disease. Today, that number is now closer to five million.

Alzheimer’s disease is one type of dementia, which is characterized by a decline in memory, language, problem solving and other thinking skills that affect a person’s ability to perform everyday tasks and activities. It is the most common type of dementia.

Is there a cure? Currently there are no drugs or treatments to cure Alzheimer’s disease.

 

However, there are some treatments that can slow down the progression.   Research is constantly being done for new options with the goal of a cure.

Alzheimer’s disease symptoms can vary, but often include: memory loss, trouble solving problems, confusion about space and time, misplacing things, inability to retrace one’s movements and mood/personality changes.

There are ways to help people coping with the early stages of the disease. Help them keep a common daily routine, keep things simple and don’t have too many activities going on at once. Overstimulation can cause confusion and anxiety. Be reassuring and don’t try to change behaviors by reasoning.

*For more information visit: alz.org, mayoclinic.org and alzinfo.org.

Posted in Alzheimer's Disease /Health Topics /Senior Living /