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May is… National Moving Month

May is traditionally the busiest month of the year when it comes to moving.  Right now, home sales continue to be brisk.  The summer months are a popular time to move, especially in Minnesota! 

Moving is always a big task and one which takes some effort and planning.  It is also an adventure with new places, people and possibilities. 

Many of our residents have made the move to Copperfield Hill after downsizing or when they want to have other services available to them.  Transportation, meals, activities, housekeeping and nursing services are just a few things that can be customized for each individual here at Copperfield Hill. 

Many of our residents have moved to Copperfield Hill because a family member or friend lives here.  We also would like to remind you of the “Friends and Family” referral program at Copperfield Hill.  Residents referring new residents will receive a referral gift.

Posted in Uncategorized /

ASK THE EXPERT // High Blood Pressure  

May is National Blood Pressure Education Month

High blood pressure is a condition in which the force of the blood against the artery walls is too high.  Uncontrolled high blood pressure raises the risk for heart disease and stroke, which are leading causes of death in the United States. Fortunately, high blood pressure is treatable and preventable. To lower your risk, get your blood pressure checked regularly and take action to control your blood pressure if it is too high. 

5 Surprising Facts About High Blood Pressure:

1.  High blood pressure is common, with more than 3 millions US cases per year.

2.  High blood pressure is linked to a higher risk for dementia, a loss of cognitive function. 

3.  Young people can have high blood pressure.  It isn’t just older adults who have high blood pressure.  Between

20 and 25 percent of men and women ages 33-44 have high blood pressure. This is linked to the rise in obesity rates.

4.  High blood pressure usually doesn’t have any symptoms.  Some call it the “silent killer”.  Even if you feel fine, have your blood pressure checked and talk to a doctor about your risk for high blood pressure.  Lack of symptoms and inconsistent checkups and health care monitoring, causes those who suffer to be undetected.

5.  Women and minorities face unique risks when it comes to high blood pressure.  Women can run into problems during pregnancy.  Some minority groups also have higher rates of high blood pressure. 

The best way to keep high blood pressure under control is to have regular health care visits and to follow instructions from your health provider. 

More information can be found at:  heart.org, cdc.gov, clevelandclinic.org and nia.nih.gov.

Posted in General Information /Health Topics /Uncategorized /

What is Podiatry??

April is National Foot Health Awareness Month

Taking care of your feet has an impact on your health.  So when we need care for our feet, why should one seek the help of a Podiatrist?  First of all, feet are a very complex part of the body.  They carry us throughout our day, while acting as shock absorbers and balance for our bodies.  Our feet require good care.  A Doctor of Podiatric Medicine or DPM, is a medical expert that has spent many years and countless hours training in the care of the foot and ankle.  DPM’s are uniquely qualified to take care of this part of the body.  Podiatrists have many fields of specialty, such as sports medicine, wound care, pediatrics and diabetic care. 

At Copperfield Hill there is a monthly podiatry clinic.  Podiatry visits can include: 

~ Comprehensive foot evaluations

~ Nail and callous management

~ Diabetic foot exams

~ Medical equipment evaluations (braces, shoe inserts, diabetic shoes)

These visits are billed to insurance and are routinely covered as office visits by Medicare.

Posted in General Information /Health Topics /Nursing /Senior Living /

ASK THE EXPERT // Keeping Your Feet Healthy

We use our feet a lot.  Most days, we don’t even realize how much.  When we start our day we plant them on the floor and set in motion our daily activities that begin with a step!  Even a moderate walker, will circle the Earth at the equator about 4 1/2 times in a lifetime.  We need our feet to be healthy and feel good.  Below are some general foot care tips for healthy feet:

· Check your feet daily to make sure you don’t have a surprise cut, sore or injured toenail.

· Wear proper fitting shoes. Shoes that are too tight can cause ingrown toenails.  Shoes that are too loose can cause blisters and can be tripping hazards.

· Trim your toenails.  Don’t remove calluses yourself.

· Keep your feet clean and dry.  Use lotion to condition the feet from dry skin.

· Get your feet checked at your healthcare visit. 

· Keep the blood flowing.  Wiggle your toes and elevate your feet when you are sitting if possible.

· Choose activities that are easy on the feet:  Walking, riding a bike or swimming are a few.

If you are a diabetic, your foot care is extremely important.  Daily care is one of the best ways to prevent foot complications.  About fifty percent of people with diabetes have some kind of nerve damage in their feet.   This can lead to loss of feeling or numbness.  Nerve damage can lower your ability to feel pain, as well as heat or cold. 

No pain sounds great, but you may not feel blisters, sores, cuts or foot ulcers that can lead to bigger problems.   If untreated these can become infected and problematic.  If you get an infection this can spread and cause your toe or foot to become compromised.  Untreated infections can cause extensive damage that can lead to loss of a toe or part of a foot. 

Copperfield Hill has a monthly podiatry clinic.  Appointments are available in each building.  Sign up is available with the nursing office or concierge.  If you have questions, please contact our nursing staff.

More information at:  cdc.gov/diabetes/library/features/healthy-feet and mayoclinic.org

Walking is a great form of exercise for everyone!

Posted in General Information /Health Topics /Uncategorized /

Services Offered at Copperfield Hill

When we talk about senior services, the question often arises:  What services do you offer?  Many senior housing communities offer services.  Services can be anything from housekeeping to more complex nursing services like medication management.  However, there are a variety of needs for a variety of people.

At Copperfield Hill, we provide an array of services that help individuals maintain a level of independency and security.  Copperfield Hill offers customized senior living for their residents. 

Our community amenities include: 

  • Transportation
  • Healthy Menu Options
  • Spiritual Enrichment
  • Daily Activities 

Additional services can include: 

  • Housekeeping
  • Meal Plans
  • Oxygen Management
  • Diabetic Management
  • Catheter Care
  • Colostomy Care

There is no “one” blueprint for our residents.  Each individual has a distinct set of wants and needs.  We are here to provide a customized plan and program to meet those wants and needs.  For that reason, we remain a vibrant and active community.  Our residents are proof of that!

Posted in About Us /Assisted Living /Community Amenities /General Information /Independent Living /Memory Care /Nursing /Senior Living /

ASK THE EXPERT // What is Assisted Living?

What exactly does Assisted Living Mean?  Simply put, assisted living provides personalized care in a residential setting.  It is designed for people who require various levels of personal and medical care.  Living spaces are normally an apartment and provide a homelike setting.  Amenities of assisted living are often the same as independent living.  Services are tailored to the needs of each person.  Personal support, medication management, health monitoring, and an active lifestyle are key for any person choosing an assisted living community. 

Memory care support is another facet of assisted living.  Many communities provide a secure area for residents needing memory support.  Again, daily activities, medication and health management are part of the program designed for each individual’s needs. 

The most common reason seniors choose assisted living is needing help with activities of daily living (ADLs).  

Those seeking assistance typically need help with two or more ADLs.  Dressing, bathing, bed transfer, toileting and meal preparation are common.  Many seniors choose a move to assisted living when they reach a point where they want the reassurance of feeling connected to a community instead of living alone and apart.  They often seek to reduce the time and effort spent on cooking, cleaning, laundry and home maintenance.

Assisted living communities typically offer rent, meals, housekeeping and medical programming.  How these services are bundled and priced vary.  Transportation services, activity and spiritual programming and other “extras” can vary from community to community.  Some services are included in the base cost of assisted living and others are an extra charge.

When an individual’s health and well-being requires a higher level of support, assisted living can be a great alternative.  It provides a healthy lifestyle and social engagement, while offering support and security for individuals and their families. 

Keep in mind, assisted living is not skilled nursing or nursing home care.  In skilled nursing, a resident receives full-time medical care by a highly trained medical staff.  There is less choice and more urgency involved when a person needs that level of care.  Assisted living options allow for a personalized level of care and more homelike (and affordable) living situation.

If you have any questions concerning housing options at Copperfield Hill, contact Sherry Price, 763-277-1008.

Posted in About Us /Assisted Living /General Information /Independent Living /Memory Care /Senior Living /

Heart Health for Valentine’s Day

February is National Hear Health Month

The American Heart Association has a strategic plan to reduce cardiovascular disease in the United States. It outlines seven of the most important behaviors people can follow to protect their cardiovascular health.

Exercise:  Regular exercise improves nearly every aspect of your health.

Eat right:  Seek out foods such as nuts, whole grains, beans, fruits,  vegetables, seafood, yogurt, and healthy fats.

Blood Pressure:  Get your blood pressure checked, make sure your heart isn’t working harder than it should be.

Cholesterol:  Know your cholesterol level and keep it low.

Keep blood sugar levels down:  Exercise and diet help keep blood  sugar levels in check.

Maintain a healthy weight:  Fat cells release many substances that increase inflammation, promote insulin resistance, and contribute to  atherosclerosis.

Don’t smoke:  Smoking and the use of tobacco products isn’t just bad for your lungs, it is bad for your heart too.

Posted in General Information /Health Topics /Heart Health /

ASK THE EXPERT // A Healthier You!

Our health is important.  You can definitely be an active participant in your journey to a healthier life.  In February, the American Heart Association spotlights on heart disease to raise awareness to the number one health risk in our country. 

Let’s face it, your heart is an amazing thing.  It keeps all the systems of the body going, beating day in and day out, pumping blood 24/7.  Oxygen and nutrient rich blood is delivered to our bodies organs and tissues—it then carries away waste.  Your heart carries out all of its work and relies on its own electrical system to do so.  

Overall, we can help our hearts by taking care of our bodies.  Everyday actions to keep you healthy include: 

Eat well – Eat a balanced and healthy diet.  Avoid fats, sugars, alcohol and caffeine.  Eat whole foods, not processed foods.  Don’t overeat.  Keeping a healthy body weight goes hand in hand with good health.

Get moving and keep moving – Not only does exercise help you burn calories, it is a great way to reduce stress.  Whether you walk, do yoga or chair exercises, exercise is great for you.

Get enough sleep – Sleep struggles affect many things, our mood and heart health among them.  It can be a vicious cycle when we lose sleep and then feel tired, cranky and unwell from lack of sleep.  Try some relaxation techniques, minimize alcohol and caffeine intake, limit screen time and go to bed at the same time each night.  Good sleep is a building block to good health. 

Keeping a positive attitude helps too.  Many things we just can’t control.  Knowing what we can control is a great way to help manage our own health.  All of the things mentioned above contribute to a healthier you. 

Happy New Year from the nursing team at Copperfield Hill! 

~Olivia Caspers, RN, BSN

Posted in Health Topics /Heart Health /Nursing /

ASK THE EXPERT // Music Therapy

What is Music Therapy?  It is the use of music to address the physical, emotional, cognitive and social needs of groups or individuals. 

Music can promote wellness, manage stress, alleviate pain, enhance memory, promote physical rehabilitation and improve communication.  Music Therapists utilize music and effectively help with the improvement of mental and physical health of individuals by using music therapy. 

The idea of music as a healing influence is as old as    ancient philosophy.  The modern birth of music therapy began after WWI and WWII when professional and   amateur musicians visited Veterans hospitals around the country.  Thousands of patients suffering with physical and emotional trauma from war responded to music.   This led doctors and nurses to request hiring of musicians by the hospitals.  It was soon evident that prior training before entering the hospitals would be of      benefit.  The first music therapy curriculum was founded at Michigan State University in 1944. 

Below is some information about Music Therapy.  We are grateful to have a Music Therapist on staff here at Copperfield Hill. 

· Music therapy is not just for people who are or were musicians. Anyone can have a connection with music and can benefit from music therapy.

· Music therapy can be used for people of all ages, from premature infants to older adults and everyone in between.

· Music therapy is a an evidence-based practice and rooted in research, just like physical, occupational and speech therapy.

· There are many different approaches and methods of music therapy.  However, all music therapy is grounded in three main principles: client preference, clinical expertise, and best available research.

· Music can be used by many individuals in ways that make us feel better, but that does not mean it is music therapy. In order to be considered music therapy, it must be performed by a board certified music therapist in a formal setting in which the music therapist and patient/client use music to work toward accomplishing specific goals. (This is the main misconception)

· While recorded music can be used for music therapy, live music is best for accomplishing most goals addressed in music therapy.

* Copperfield Hill’s Music Therapist, Bailey Blatchley, MT-BC contributed to this article.  Learn more at musictherapy.org

Posted in General Information /Health Topics /Human Interest /Spiritual Well Being /Uncategorized /

The Great American Smoke Out

Each year, the American Cancer Society hosts the Great American Smoke out on the third Thursday in November.  The Great American Smoke out is an opportunity for people who smoke, to make a plan to quit and commit to a smoke-free and healthier life.  The smoke out starts with one day, but it has the intention of providing individuals with the motivation to quit smoking for good.  Use this date to quit altogether or to make a plan to quit.  The Great American Smoke out event not only is the challenge for individuals to stop smoking but also help people with tools that they can use to help them quit and stay that way.

A deadly and tough to kick addiction, nicotine in cigarettes is one of the strongest additions one can have.  Quitting is not easy for many who smoke.  Like other health improvement plans, one needs the commitment and a plan to make that commitment realized.  There are many quitting methods, such as prescription medications and counseling support.  It is always recommended to consult your health care advisor for information and support.  Having support is a proven way to be successful.

The Great American Smoke out began in the 1970’s when smoking and second hand smoke were very common.  In 1970 at an event in Randolph, MA, people were asked to give up cigarettes for one day and donate the money they saved to a high school scholarship fund.  In 1974 in Monticello, MN another don’t smoke day was spearheaded.  The movement caught on and in 1976 the CA American Cancer Society got nearly 1 million people to quit for the day.  The Smoke out went nation-wide in 1977.  Since then, a lot has changed.  Public view of smoking has changed.  Many public places and work spaces began the move towards a smoke free environment.  Today, very few buildings allow smoking inside. 

Today, less than 16% of Americans smoke.  However over 37 million Americans still smoke.  Each year close to half a million people die from illness caused by smoking.  Smoking is the leading cause of cancer deaths in the US.

Changing attitudes have helped reduce the number of deaths and illness.  Improving your health and quitting smoking go hand in hand. 

Learn more at www.cancer.org.

Posted in General Information /Health Topics /Human Interest /